Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia

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Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will speak at this program exploring the intimate connection between Gustav Mahler’s 8th Symphony (also known as the “Symphony of a Thousand”) and the international emergence of the Orchestra.

For information about the cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

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Music has been used both as a vehicle for reform and repression during the pursuits of American ethnic and racial justice. Using historical sheet music, broadsides from local theaters, and musical recordings and performances, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania explores the various ways Philadelphia popular culture has depicted American ethnic groups throughout the past two centuries with Sights & Sounds of our Multiethnic Past. Far from "high culture," these musical and artistic characterizations were often irreverent and poked fun at the proclivities and habits of different ethnic or racial groups living in Philadelphia. However, these materials also document prevailing prejudices and bigotry, offering a sneak peek into the development of social attitudes via popular music and theater. Collection materials from the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies – many not seen for decades – will also be on view.

For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

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Philadelphia has an extraordinarily rich and important musical history. From the late eighteenth century, when it was the political and cultural capital of the American colonies, to the present, the city has nurtured numerous ground breaking musical styles and artists and been at the forefront of some of the world’s most significant musical developments. Music historian Jack McCarthy explores some of the highlights of Philadelphia music over the course of more than 330 years. Featured will be the stories of America’s first song composer, first African American to have his music published, the nation’s first “mega-concert,” great organizations such as the Philadelphia Orchestra, Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia International Records, and Cameo-Parkway Records, as well as many of the city’s groundbreaking artists in classical music, jazz, gospel, rock n’ roll, rhythm & blues/soul.

For further information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

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Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

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Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

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Created Equal? Freedom Riders: Roadblocks and Redemption on "Freedom's Main Line"
Thursday, March 26, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.
National Constitution Center,
525 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free

In 1961, U.S. Supreme Court decisions that overturned racial segregation in interstate travel were largely ignored in the South. To challenge this status quo, more than 400 black and white Americans, called Freedom Riders, performed a simple act: they traveled into the segregated South in small interracial groups and sat where they pleased on interstate buses.

The National Constitution Center invites you to a screening of Freedom Riders, exploring the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of these volunteers as they risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. The film includes previously unseen amateur 8mm footage of the burning bus on which some Freedom Riders were temporarily trapped, taken by a local twelve-year-old and held as evidence since 1961 by the FBI.

Jeffrey Rosen, NCC’s President & CEO and a constitutional law scholar, will discuss the heroic acts of the Freedom Riders and the conflicts with the Kennedy administration. Guest speakers will join in the lively conversation about the 1961 Freedom Rides, and attendees will take a tour through the new Kennedy Exhibition. 


About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Thursday, March 12, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania
1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free

In this program of the Created Equal? series, we will view clips from The Loving Story and consider legal battles over the question of who can get married and who gets to decide.

The documentary explores the experiences of Mildred and Richard Loving. While they knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia - because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white -  they never expected to be woken up in their bedroom and arrested one night in 1958. The documentary brings to life the Lovings’ marriage and the legal battle that followed through little-known filmed interviews and photographs shot for Life magazine.

Regina Austin, William A. Schnader Professor of Law and Director, Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law, will  provide context and discuss the precedent set by this case for the recent state and federal court battles over gay marriage.  Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will then facilitate discussion.


About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Created Equal? Slavery By Another Name: Past and Present Ideas of “Dangerous Blackness”

Thursday, February 26, 2015, 6- 7:30pm
African American Museum in Philadelphia
701 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free.

By 1865, despite the promise of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Thirteenth Amendment, and the Confederate defeat in the Civil War, many former slaves did not in reality experience “a new birth of freedom.” It was a shocking reality often unacknowledged, then and now: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted until the second world war.

The African American Museum in Philadelphia invites you to a screening of Slavery By Another Name. Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subjected to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor. Interviews with the descendants of victims and perpetrators resonate with a modern audience. Christina Comer, who discovered how her family profited from the system, says that “the story is important no matter how painful the reality is.”

Working with Emahunn Campbell, PhD Student in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at University of Massachusetts Amherst, the African American Museum in Philadelphia  will also explore conceptions of African American criminality in the late 19th Century and the present day, using Slavery By Another Name as a guiding source. Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, will faciliate discussion.

Slavery by Another Name: Jon Van Amber and Omni Studio

About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopdia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Created Equal? The Abolitionists: Radicals. Agitators. Troublemakers. Liberators.

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 6-7:30pm
Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent
15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free.
Pre-registration is requested.

Beginning in the 1830s, several religious, social, and political reform movements swept through the United States. Among the men and women leading these reforms were abolitionists who fought to end slavery, an institution they believed to be incompatible with the founding principles of the nation.

The Philadelphia History Museum invites you to a screening of The Abolitionists, a documentary film vividly bringing to life the struggles of these ordinary men and women - black and white, enslaved and free – that culminated in the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment. Through innovative use of reenactments, this three-episode series puts a face on the anti-slavery movement—or rather, five faces: William Lloyd Garrison, impassioned New England newspaper editor; Frederick Douglass, former slave, author, and activist; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the enormously influential Uncle Tom’s Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. The film’s release in 2013 also marked the 150th anniversary of the Proclamation.

Dr. Lawrence Little, Associate Professor of History at Villanova University, will discuss how the issues and themes raised in the film relate to current events. Objects from PHM’s collections will be on display during the program, including a “free labor” girl’s dress circa 1840s. 

About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum,  and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Wednesday, October 22, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia History Museum

Join us at the Philadelphia History Museum for conversation with Jean R. Soderlund, author of the new book Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn, and a film screening by History Making Productions.

About the book:
Lenape Country is a sweeping narrative history of the multi­ethnic society of the Delaware Valley in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. After Swanendael, the Natives, Swedes, and Finns avoided war by focusing on trade and forging strategic alliances in such events as the Dutch conquest, the Mercurius affair, the Long Swede conspiracy, and English attempts to seize land. Drawing on a wide range of sources, author Jean R. Soderlund demonstrates that the hallmarks of Delaware Valley society—commitment to personal freedom, religious liberty, peaceful resolution of conflict, and opposition to hierarchical government—began in the Delaware Valley not with Quaker ideals or the leadership of William Penn but with the Lenape Indians, whose culture played a key role in shaping Delaware Valley society.

Jean R. Soderlund is Professor of History at Lehigh University and editor of William Penn and the Founding of Pennsylvania: A Documentary History. She is an associate editor of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.

About the film:
A Lost World, the sixth episode of the documentary series Philadelphia: The Great Experiment by History Making Productions tells the story of Philadelphia between 1600-1680.

The program is FREE to Museum Members. $10 General Public. Pre-registration is requested. Books will be available for purchase.

Register today!

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Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will speak at this program exploring the intimate connection between Gustav Mahler’s 8th Symphony (also known as the “Symphony of a Thousand”) and the international emergence of the Orchestra.

For information about the cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

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Wednesday, October 22, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia History Museum

Join us at the Philadelphia History Museum for conversation with Jean R. Soderlund, author of the new book Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn, and a film screening by History Making Productions.

About the book:
Lenape Country is a sweeping narrative history of the multi­ethnic society of the Delaware Valley in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. After Swanendael, the Natives, Swedes, and Finns avoided war by focusing on trade and forging strategic alliances in such events as the Dutch conquest, the Mercurius affair, the Long Swede conspiracy, and English attempts to seize land. Drawing on a wide range of sources, author Jean R. Soderlund demonstrates that the hallmarks of Delaware Valley society—commitment to personal freedom, religious liberty, peaceful resolution of conflict, and opposition to hierarchical government—began in the Delaware Valley not with Quaker ideals or the leadership of William Penn but with the Lenape Indians, whose culture played a key role in shaping Delaware Valley society.

Jean R. Soderlund is Professor of History at Lehigh University and editor of William Penn and the Founding of Pennsylvania: A Documentary History. She is an associate editor of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.

About the film:
A Lost World, the sixth episode of the documentary series Philadelphia: The Great Experiment by History Making Productions tells the story of Philadelphia between 1600-1680.

The program is FREE to Museum Members. $10 General Public. Pre-registration is requested. Books will be available for purchase.

Register today!

[time] => 5:30 p.m. [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-lenape-country-delaware-valley-society-before-william-penn/ [links] => ) [1423699200] => Array ( [startdate] => February 12, 2015 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia. [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? The Abolitionists [content] =>

Created Equal? The Abolitionists: Radicals. Agitators. Troublemakers. Liberators.

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 6-7:30pm
Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent
15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free.
Pre-registration is requested.

Beginning in the 1830s, several religious, social, and political reform movements swept through the United States. Among the men and women leading these reforms were abolitionists who fought to end slavery, an institution they believed to be incompatible with the founding principles of the nation.

The Philadelphia History Museum invites you to a screening of The Abolitionists, a documentary film vividly bringing to life the struggles of these ordinary men and women - black and white, enslaved and free – that culminated in the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment. Through innovative use of reenactments, this three-episode series puts a face on the anti-slavery movement—or rather, five faces: William Lloyd Garrison, impassioned New England newspaper editor; Frederick Douglass, former slave, author, and activist; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the enormously influential Uncle Tom’s Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. The film’s release in 2013 also marked the 150th anniversary of the Proclamation.

Dr. Lawrence Little, Associate Professor of History at Villanova University, will discuss how the issues and themes raised in the film relate to current events. Objects from PHM’s collections will be on display during the program, including a “free labor” girl’s dress circa 1840s. 

About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum,  and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

[time] => 6-7:30 p.m. [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-created-equal-the-abolitionists/ [links] => ) [1424908800] => Array ( [startdate] => February 26, 2015 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => African American Museum in Philadelphia, 701 Arch Street [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? Slavery by Another Name [content] =>

Created Equal? Slavery By Another Name: Past and Present Ideas of “Dangerous Blackness”

Thursday, February 26, 2015, 6- 7:30pm
African American Museum in Philadelphia
701 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free.

By 1865, despite the promise of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Thirteenth Amendment, and the Confederate defeat in the Civil War, many former slaves did not in reality experience “a new birth of freedom.” It was a shocking reality often unacknowledged, then and now: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted until the second world war.

The African American Museum in Philadelphia invites you to a screening of Slavery By Another Name. Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subjected to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor. Interviews with the descendants of victims and perpetrators resonate with a modern audience. Christina Comer, who discovered how her family profited from the system, says that “the story is important no matter how painful the reality is.”

Working with Emahunn Campbell, PhD Student in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at University of Massachusetts Amherst, the African American Museum in Philadelphia  will also explore conceptions of African American criminality in the late 19th Century and the present day, using Slavery By Another Name as a guiding source. Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, will faciliate discussion.

Slavery by Another Name: Jon Van Amber and Omni Studio

About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopdia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

[time] => 6-7:30 p.m. [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-created-equal-slavery-by-another-name/ [links] => ) [1426118400] => Array ( [startdate] => March 12, 2015 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? The Loving Story: Who Decides Who Marries Whom [content] =>

Thursday, March 12, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania
1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free

In this program of the Created Equal? series, we will view clips from The Loving Story and consider legal battles over the question of who can get married and who gets to decide.

The documentary explores the experiences of Mildred and Richard Loving. While they knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia - because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white -  they never expected to be woken up in their bedroom and arrested one night in 1958. The documentary brings to life the Lovings’ marriage and the legal battle that followed through little-known filmed interviews and photographs shot for Life magazine.

Regina Austin, William A. Schnader Professor of Law and Director, Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law, will  provide context and discuss the precedent set by this case for the recent state and federal court battles over gay marriage.  Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will then facilitate discussion.


About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

[time] => 6-7:30 p.m. [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/created-equal-the-loving-story-who-decides-who-marries-whom/ [links] => ) [1427328000] => Array ( [startdate] => March 26, 2015 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => National Constitution Center, 525 Arch Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? Freedom Riders [content] =>

Created Equal? Freedom Riders: Roadblocks and Redemption on "Freedom's Main Line"
Thursday, March 26, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.
National Constitution Center,
525 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free

In 1961, U.S. Supreme Court decisions that overturned racial segregation in interstate travel were largely ignored in the South. To challenge this status quo, more than 400 black and white Americans, called Freedom Riders, performed a simple act: they traveled into the segregated South in small interracial groups and sat where they pleased on interstate buses.

The National Constitution Center invites you to a screening of Freedom Riders, exploring the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of these volunteers as they risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. The film includes previously unseen amateur 8mm footage of the burning bus on which some Freedom Riders were temporarily trapped, taken by a local twelve-year-old and held as evidence since 1961 by the FBI.

Jeffrey Rosen, NCC’s President & CEO and a constitutional law scholar, will discuss the heroic acts of the Freedom Riders and the conflicts with the Kennedy administration. Guest speakers will join in the lively conversation about the 1961 Freedom Rides, and attendees will take a tour through the new Kennedy Exhibition. 


About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

[time] => 6-7:30 p.m. [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-created-equal-freedom-riders/ [links] => ) [1434844800] => Array ( [startdate] => June 21, 2015 [enddate] => June 26, 2015 [no-end-date] => [location] => Philadelphia [title] => NEH Teacher Institute: Cultures of Independence [content] =>

Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

[time] => [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/neh-teacher-workshop-cultures-of-independence/ [links] => ) [1437868800] => Array ( [startdate] => July 26, 2015 [enddate] => July 31, 2015 [no-end-date] => [location] => Philadelphia [title] => NEH Teacher Institute: Cultures of Independence [content] =>

Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

[time] => [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/neh-teacher-workshop-cultures-of-independence-2/ [links] => ) [1455667200] => Array ( [startdate] => February 17, 2016 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Philadelphia, City of Music [content] =>

Philadelphia has an extraordinarily rich and important musical history. From the late eighteenth century, when it was the political and cultural capital of the American colonies, to the present, the city has nurtured numerous ground breaking musical styles and artists and been at the forefront of some of the world’s most significant musical developments. Music historian Jack McCarthy explores some of the highlights of Philadelphia music over the course of more than 330 years. Featured will be the stories of America’s first song composer, first African American to have his music published, the nation’s first “mega-concert,” great organizations such as the Philadelphia Orchestra, Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia International Records, and Cameo-Parkway Records, as well as many of the city’s groundbreaking artists in classical music, jazz, gospel, rock n’ roll, rhythm & blues/soul.

For further information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

[time] => 6-7 p.m. [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-philadelphia-city-of-music/ [links] => ) [1456876800] => Array ( [startdate] => March 02, 2016 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Sights & Sounds of Our Ethnic Past [content] =>

Music has been used both as a vehicle for reform and repression during the pursuits of American ethnic and racial justice. Using historical sheet music, broadsides from local theaters, and musical recordings and performances, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania explores the various ways Philadelphia popular culture has depicted American ethnic groups throughout the past two centuries with Sights & Sounds of our Multiethnic Past. Far from "high culture," these musical and artistic characterizations were often irreverent and poked fun at the proclivities and habits of different ethnic or racial groups living in Philadelphia. However, these materials also document prevailing prejudices and bigotry, offering a sneak peek into the development of social attitudes via popular music and theater. Collection materials from the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies – many not seen for decades – will also be on view.

For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

[time] => 6-7 p.m. [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-sights-sounds-of-our-ethnic-past/ [links] => ) [1457418600] => Array ( [startdate] => March 08, 2016 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: The Symphony of a Thousand [content] =>

Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will speak at this program exploring the intimate connection between Gustav Mahler’s 8th Symphony (also known as the “Symphony of a Thousand”) and the international emergence of the Orchestra.

For information about the cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

[time] => 6:30-8:30 p.m. [url] => http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/the-symphony-of-a-thousand/ [links] => ) )

Archived Events

  • March 08, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: The Symphony of a Thousand

    Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will speak at this program exploring the intimate connection between Gustav Mahler’s 8th Symphony (also known as the “Symphony of a Thousand”) and the international emergence of the Orchestra.

    For information about the cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s Memories & Melodies web page.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • March 02, 2016, 6-7 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Sights & Sounds of Our Ethnic Past

    Music has been used both as a vehicle for reform and repression during the pursuits of American ethnic and racial justice. Using historical sheet music, broadsides from local theaters, and musical recordings and performances, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania explores the various ways Philadelphia popular culture has depicted American ethnic groups throughout the past two centuries with Sights & Sounds of our Multiethnic Past. Far from “high culture,” these musical and artistic characterizations were often irreverent and poked fun at the proclivities and habits of different ethnic or racial groups living in Philadelphia. However, these materials also document prevailing prejudices and bigotry, offering a sneak peek into the development of social attitudes via popular music and theater. Collection materials from the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies – many not seen for decades – will also be on view.

    For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s Memories & Melodies web page.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • February 17, 2016, 6-7 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Philadelphia, City of Music

    Philadelphia has an extraordinarily rich and important musical history. From the late eighteenth century, when it was the political and cultural capital of the American colonies, to the present, the city has nurtured numerous ground breaking musical styles and artists and been at the forefront of some of the world’s most significant musical developments. Music historian Jack McCarthy explores some of the highlights of Philadelphia music over the course of more than 330 years. Featured will be the stories of America’s first song composer, first African American to have his music published, the nation’s first “mega-concert,” great organizations such as the Philadelphia Orchestra, Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia International Records, and Cameo-Parkway Records, as well as many of the city’s groundbreaking artists in classical music, jazz, gospel, rock n’ roll, rhythm & blues/soul.

    For further information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s Memories & Melodies web page.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • July 26, 2015-July 31, 2015—NEH Teacher Institute: Cultures of Independence

    Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

    The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
    For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.


    Location: Philadelphia

  • June 21, 2015-June 26, 2015—NEH Teacher Institute: Cultures of Independence

    Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

    The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
    For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.


    Location: Philadelphia

  • March 26, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? Freedom Riders

    Created Equal? Freedom Riders: Roadblocks and Redemption on “Freedom’s Main Line”
    Thursday, March 26, 2015, 67:30 p.m.
    National Constitution Center,
    525 Arch Street, Philadelphia
    Admission Free

    In 1961, U.S. Supreme Court decisions that overturned racial segregation in interstate travel were largely ignored in the South. To challenge this status quo, more than 400 black and white Americans, called Freedom Riders, performed a simple act: they traveled into the segregated South in small interracial groups and sat where they pleased on interstate buses.

    The National Constitution Center invites you to a screening of Freedom Riders, exploring the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of these volunteers as they risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. The film includes previously unseen amateur 8mm footage of the burning bus on which some Freedom Riders were temporarily trapped, taken by a local twelve-year-old and held as evidence since 1961 by the FBI.

    Jeffrey Rosen, NCC’s President & CEO and a constitutional law scholar, will discuss the heroic acts of the Freedom Riders and the conflicts with the Kennedy administration. Guest speakers will join in the lively conversation about the 1961 Freedom Rides, and attendees will take a tour through the new Kennedy Exhibition. 


    About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

    To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

    The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

    The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


    Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.


    Location: National Constitution Center, 525 Arch Street, Philadelphia

  • March 12, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? The Loving Story: Who Decides Who Marries Whom

    Thursday, March 12, 2015, 67:30 p.m.
    Historical Society of Pennsylvania
    1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia
    Admission Free

    In this program of the Created Equal? series, we will view clips from The Loving Story and consider legal battles over the question of who can get married and who gets to decide.

    The documentary explores the experiences of Mildred and Richard Loving. While they knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia – because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white –  they never expected to be woken up in their bedroom and arrested one night in 1958. The documentary brings to life the Lovings’ marriage and the legal battle that followed through little-known filmed interviews and photographs shot for Life magazine.

    Regina Austin, William A. Schnader Professor of Law and Director, Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law, will  provide context and discuss the precedent set by this case for the recent state and federal court battles over gay marriage.  Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will then facilitate discussion.


    About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

    To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

    The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

    The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


    Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • February 26, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? Slavery by Another Name

    Created Equal? Slavery By Another Name: Past and Present Ideas of “Dangerous Blackness”

    Thursday, February 26, 2015, 67:30pm
    African American Museum in Philadelphia
    701 Arch Street, Philadelphia
    Admission Free.

    By 1865, despite the promise of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Thirteenth Amendment, and the Confederate defeat in the Civil War, many former slaves did not in reality experience “a new birth of freedom.” It was a shocking reality often unacknowledged, then and now: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted until the second world war.

    The African American Museum in Philadelphia invites you to a screening of Slavery By Another Name. Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subjected to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor. Interviews with the descendants of victims and perpetrators resonate with a modern audience. Christina Comer, who discovered how her family profited from the system, says that “the story is important no matter how painful the reality is.”

    Working with Emahunn Campbell, PhD Student in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at University of Massachusetts Amherst, the African American Museum in Philadelphia  will also explore conceptions of African American criminality in the late 19th Century and the present day, using Slavery By Another Name as a guiding source. Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, will faciliate discussion.

    Slavery by Another Name: Jon Van Amber and Omni Studio

    About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

    To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopdia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

    The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

    The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


    Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.


    Location: African American Museum in Philadelphia, 701 Arch Street

  • February 12, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? The Abolitionists

    Created Equal? The Abolitionists: Radicals. Agitators. Troublemakers. Liberators.

    Thursday, February 12, 2015, 6-7:30pm
    Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent
    15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia
    Admission Free.
    Pre-registration is requested.

    Beginning in the 1830s, several religious, social, and political reform movements swept through the United States. Among the men and women leading these reforms were abolitionists who fought to end slavery, an institution they believed to be incompatible with the founding principles of the nation.

    The Philadelphia History Museum invites you to a screening of The Abolitionists, a documentary film vividly bringing to life the struggles of these ordinary men and women – black and white, enslaved and free – that culminated in the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment. Through innovative use of reenactments, this three-episode series puts a face on the anti-slavery movement—or rather, five faces: William Lloyd Garrison, impassioned New England newspaper editor; Frederick Douglass, former slave, author, and activist; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the enormously influential Uncle Tom’s Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. The film’s release in 2013 also marked the 150th anniversary of the Proclamation.

    Dr. Lawrence Little, Associate Professor of History at Villanova University, will discuss how the issues and themes raised in the film relate to current events. Objects from PHM’s collections will be on display during the program, including a “free labor” girl’s dress circa 1840s. 

    About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

    To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum,  and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

    The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

    The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


    Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.


    Location: Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia.

  • October 22, 2014, 5:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn

    Wednesday, October 22, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
    Philadelphia History Museum

    Join us at the Philadelphia History Museum for conversation with Jean R. Soderlund, author of the new book Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn, and a film screening by History Making Productions.

    About the book:
    Lenape Country is a sweeping narrative history of the multi­ethnic society of the Delaware Valley in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. After Swanendael, the Natives, Swedes, and Finns avoided war by focusing on trade and forging strategic alliances in such events as the Dutch conquest, the Mercurius affair, the Long Swede conspiracy, and English attempts to seize land. Drawing on a wide range of sources, author Jean R. Soderlund demonstrates that the hallmarks of Delaware Valley society—commitment to personal freedom, religious liberty, peaceful resolution of conflict, and opposition to hierarchical government—began in the Delaware Valley not with Quaker ideals or the leadership of William Penn but with the Lenape Indians, whose culture played a key role in shaping Delaware Valley society.

    Jean R. Soderlund is Professor of History at Lehigh University and editor of William Penn and the Founding of Pennsylvania: A Documentary History. She is an associate editor of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.

    About the film:
    A Lost World, the sixth episode of the documentary series Philadelphia: The Great Experiment by History Making Productions tells the story of Philadelphia between 1600-1680.

    The program is FREE to Museum Members. $10 General Public. Pre-registration is requested. Books will be available for purchase.

    Register today!


    Location: Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia

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