Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia

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Thursday, March 12, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania
1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free

In this program of the Created Equal? series, we will view clips from The Loving Story and consider legal battles over the question of who can get married and who gets to decide.

The documentary explores the experiences of Mildred and Richard Loving. While they knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia - because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white -  they never expected to be woken up in their bedroom and arrested one night in 1958. The documentary brings to life the Lovings’ marriage and the legal battle that followed through little-known filmed interviews and photographs shot for Life magazine.

Regina Austin, William A. Schnader Professor of Law and Director, Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law, will  provide context and discuss the precedent set by this case for the recent state and federal court battles over gay marriage.  Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will then facilitate discussion.


About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Created Equal? Slavery By Another Name: Past and Present Ideas of “Dangerous Blackness”

Thursday, February 26, 2015, 6- 7:30pm
African American Museum in Philadelphia
701 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free.

By 1865, despite the promise of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Thirteenth Amendment, and the Confederate defeat in the Civil War, many former slaves did not in reality experience “a new birth of freedom.” It was a shocking reality often unacknowledged, then and now: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted until the second world war.

The African American Museum in Philadelphia invites you to a screening of Slavery By Another Name. Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subjected to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor. Interviews with the descendants of victims and perpetrators resonate with a modern audience. Christina Comer, who discovered how her family profited from the system, says that “the story is important no matter how painful the reality is.”

Working with Emahunn Campbell, PhD Student in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at University of Massachusetts Amherst, the African American Museum in Philadelphia  will also explore conceptions of African American criminality in the late 19th Century and the present day, using Slavery By Another Name as a guiding source. Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, will faciliate discussion.

Slavery by Another Name: Jon Van Amber and Omni Studio

About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopdia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Created Equal? The Abolitionists: Radicals. Agitators. Troublemakers. Liberators.

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 6-7:30pm
Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent
15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free.
Pre-registration is requested.

Beginning in the 1830s, several religious, social, and political reform movements swept through the United States. Among the men and women leading these reforms were abolitionists who fought to end slavery, an institution they believed to be incompatible with the founding principles of the nation.

The Philadelphia History Museum invites you to a screening of The Abolitionists, a documentary film vividly bringing to life the struggles of these ordinary men and women - black and white, enslaved and free – that culminated in the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment. Through innovative use of reenactments, this three-episode series puts a face on the anti-slavery movement—or rather, five faces: William Lloyd Garrison, impassioned New England newspaper editor; Frederick Douglass, former slave, author, and activist; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the enormously influential Uncle Tom’s Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. The film’s release in 2013 also marked the 150th anniversary of the Proclamation.

Dr. Lawrence Little, Associate Professor of History at Villanova University, will discuss how the issues and themes raised in the film relate to current events. Objects from PHM’s collections will be on display during the program, including a “free labor” girl’s dress circa 1840s. 

About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum,  and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Wednesday, October 22, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia History Museum

Join us at the Philadelphia History Museum for conversation with Jean R. Soderlund, author of the new book Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn, and a film screening by History Making Productions.

About the book:
Lenape Country is a sweeping narrative history of the multi­ethnic society of the Delaware Valley in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. After Swanendael, the Natives, Swedes, and Finns avoided war by focusing on trade and forging strategic alliances in such events as the Dutch conquest, the Mercurius affair, the Long Swede conspiracy, and English attempts to seize land. Drawing on a wide range of sources, author Jean R. Soderlund demonstrates that the hallmarks of Delaware Valley society—commitment to personal freedom, religious liberty, peaceful resolution of conflict, and opposition to hierarchical government—began in the Delaware Valley not with Quaker ideals or the leadership of William Penn but with the Lenape Indians, whose culture played a key role in shaping Delaware Valley society.

Jean R. Soderlund is Professor of History at Lehigh University and editor of William Penn and the Founding of Pennsylvania: A Documentary History. She is an associate editor of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.

About the film:
A Lost World, the sixth episode of the documentary series Philadelphia: The Great Experiment by History Making Productions tells the story of Philadelphia between 1600-1680.

The program is FREE to Museum Members. $10 General Public. Pre-registration is requested. Books will be available for purchase.

Register today!

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Tuesday, November 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania

During the mid 19th century, large numbers of Irish citizens made the perilous journey to America with the the hopes of escaping poverty, famine, and oppression. As thousands of immigrants made Philadelphia their home, they were met with religious and ethnic prejudices.  Moderated by Charlene Mires, professor of History at Rutgers-Camden and editor-in-chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, a panel of experts will examine the challenges and issues faced by the Irish as they struggled to integrate into American society.  A reception and performance of traditional Irish music will follow. For complete information, link to the event website at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

Speaker Bios:

Dr. William Watson is a professor of History at Immaculata University and Director of the Duffy's Cut Project. He's the author of  numerous articles and worked on several  books including: The Irish-Americans: The History and Culture of a People (forthcoming, ABC-Clio, November, 2014), The Ghosts of Duffy's Cut (Praeger, 2006), Tricolor and Crescent: France and the Islamic World, and The Collapse of Communism in the Soviet Union (Greenwood, 1998).

Zachary Schragg is a professor of history at George Mason University and the author of two books, The Great Society Subway: A History of the Washington Metro and Ethical Imperialism: Institutional Review Boards and the Social Sciences, 1965-2009, both published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. He is currently working on a narrative history of the Philadelphia riots of 1844 and contributed the essay on this topic for The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.

Michael Johnson graduated summa cum laude from the University of Notre Dame in 2012 with a degree in History, United States concentration. While at Notre Dame he was a member of Phi Alpha Theta, the history national honor society, Phi Beta Kappa, a national academic honor society, and also served as a Gilder Lehrman History Scholar. His honors thesis “‘Be Patriots Because You Have a Country’: The Fenian Brotherhood and Irish-American Identity in Civil War-Era Philadelphia” received the University’s O’Hagan Award for best essay on Irish history. He is presently pursuing a Master’s Degree in History, United States concentration at Villanova University. His interests include nineteenth century United States History and the Civil War era, particularly questions of race, ethnicity, and identity. He is currently working with Dr. Judith Giesberg and two fellow students on a study of the Institute for Colored Youth, an elite school for African American children in nineteenth century Philadelphia.

James Kopaczewski graduated from St. Joseph’s University in 2013 with a B.A. in History and International Relations. While at St. Joseph’s, Jim was a member of Phi Alpha Theta and served as a Summer Scholar where he researched Irish immigration to the United States in the early 19th century. Following graduation, he switched sides in the Holy War and made the short move up Lancaster Avenue to Villanova. At Villanova, he is a second year M.A. student whose concentration is in United States History with an emphasis on the Civil War Era. He is also interested in the Union home front in the Civil War, masculinity in the 19th century, and Irish-American studies.

Charlene Mires is the Director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities and Professor of History at Rutgers-Camden, where she teaches courses in public, urban, and U.S. history. She is the author of Independence Hall in American Memory (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002), which received the Philadelphia Athenaeum Literary Award; Capital of the World: The Race to Host the United Nations (NYU Press, 2013); as well as articles in The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Pennsylvania History, The Public Historian, and other journals. As a journalist, she was a co-winner of the Pulitzer Prize for general local reporting awarded to the staff of the Fort Wayne (Ind.) News-Sentinel in 1983 for coverage of the floods that ravaged that city in 1982.

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Thursday, October 30, 7-9 p.m.
National Mechanics Philadelphia Bar & Restaurant

Think you know Philadelphia history? Test your knowledge of the City of Brotherly Love in this special pub quiz organized by the Delaware Valley Archivists Group as the capstone event of Archives Month Philly. Questions plumbed from the annals of our city’s past by your friendly local archivists will challenge you to recall the people, places, and events that make Philadelphia unique. For more information, link to the website of Archives Month Philly.

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Saturday, September 27, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

Join the Association of Philadelphia Tour Guides (APT) for this free guided walking tour to celebrate Philadelphia's wealth of cultural, historic and visitor sites. The event begins at 8 a.m. in the historic area, continues in four 2 ½ hour phases and ends at 7:30 pm at the Schuylkill River. Participants can elect to walk the entire tour, or join any phase. The Great Tour is free, but advance registration is highly recommended to ensure that there are enough guides for all phases of the tour. Registration instructions and added information on the tour are available on the APT website.

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Visit Philadelphia's industrial past and explore the changing landscape and communities of an industrial neighborhood on this walking tour presented by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Meet at the Philadelphia History Museum to join the Encyclopedia's tour project manager, Jacob Downs (M.A., Rutgers-Camden), for a short trip on the Market-Frankford El to the Tioga Street Station and the Harrowgate neighborhood, once a center for dye works, carpet mills, and other textile mills, and one of the most densely populated working-class areas of Philadelphia.

Drawing upon the work of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia's authors and editors, the tour offers an opportunity to engage with important questions about the dramatic changes that Harrowgate and similar neighborhoods have experienced in the past two centuries. Why did the characteristics of the neighborhood's population shift so dramatically in the twentieth century? What defines community, and what happens when community institutions are lost? Does a neighborhood need churches, banks, schools, and playgrounds to develop community? Why are some sections of the city experiencing problems with crime, poverty, and poor education, while others are being revitalized?

On a walk of about one mile, the tour will highlight the neighborhood's industrial past with visits to the former Richardson’s Mints factory and Luithlien Dye House. Along the way, we also will explore the meaning of community by examining the two major parishes in the area, St. Joan of Arc and Ascension of our Lord, and the ways they were affected by the neighborhood's changing changing demographics in the mid-twentieth century. The tour will move north toward the Sheridan Middle School and end with a walk through the Kensington and Allegheny (K & A) section, where signs of community from the past mingle with the present.

There is no charge for this tour, but space is limited. Please register in advance at http://harrowgatetour.eventbrite.com/.

This Walking Encyclopedia Tour is presented by the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, a civic project to increase understanding of the city and region, and administered by the Philadelphia History Museum. This project is made possible by the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage.

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Co-Sponsored Event: How close did Philadelphia come to becoming the Capital of the World?

Join the Philadelphia History Museum for the next event in its popular Conversations series. This program, presented in conjunction with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, will explore Capital of the World: The Race to the Host the United Nations, the newly published book by Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers-Camden, and a co-recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism. With a sweeping view of the United States’ place in the world at the end of World War II, the book tells the dramatic, surprising, and at times comic story of hometown promoters in pursuit of an extraordinary prize and the diplomats who struggled with the balance of power at a pivotal moment in history. Mires will delve into the fascinating account of Philadelphia's involvement in the national competition to house the UN headquarters.

This event will be recorded for C-Span's Book TV. Visitors are invited to view the Museum's exhibitions from 5:00-6:00 p.m. The program begins promptly at 6:00 p.m., with a reception, including music from the 1940's and book signing.  Books will be available for purchase. Reception made possible by the NYU Press.

Free and open to the public.  Please register in advance.

Click here for more information or to register.

Teachers attending this event may register for Act 48 credits through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

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This year marks the thirtieth anniversary of the publication of Still Philadelphia: A Photographic History, 1890-1940, one of the most acclaimed and successful photographic history books of the past generation. Compiled and written by Fredric M. Miller, Morris J. Vogel and Allen F. Davis, Still Philadelphia—which stands out as one of the best selling book’s in Temple University Press’s history—still shapes how the region’s history is told, while inspiring a new generation of social historians and photographers. The 2013 Fredric M. Miller Lecture joins with Temple University’s New Philadelphia History Forum in organizing a presentation of the book on April 24, 5-7:30 p.m. at the Philadelphia History Museum, 15 South Seventh Street, Philadelphia, 19106. Morris J. Vogel (President, Lower East Side Tenement Museum) and Allen F. Davis (Professor Emeritus, Temple University) will be joined by Philadelphia Inquirer metropolitan photography editor Cheryl Shugars for a roundtable discussion on the book’s legacy, the origins of the project, and the role of photography in shaping urban memory.

Free and open to the public. Museum galleries open for viewing at 5 p.m. Wine and cheese reception begins at 5:30 p.m.

All available seats for this program have been taken, but if you add your name to the waiting list, you will be notified if spaces become available: http://miller2013nphf.eventbrite.com/

The Fredric M. Miller Lecture in Public History is administered by the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at Rutgers-Camden. The New Philadelphia History Forum, now in its second year, is an annual public discussion of the emerging scholarship of the region’s history.

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Thursday, March 12, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania
1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free

In this program of the Created Equal? series, we will view clips from The Loving Story and consider legal battles over the question of who can get married and who gets to decide.

The documentary explores the experiences of Mildred and Richard Loving. While they knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia - because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white -  they never expected to be woken up in their bedroom and arrested one night in 1958. The documentary brings to life the Lovings’ marriage and the legal battle that followed through little-known filmed interviews and photographs shot for Life magazine.

Regina Austin, William A. Schnader Professor of Law and Director, Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law, will  provide context and discuss the precedent set by this case for the recent state and federal court battles over gay marriage.  Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will then facilitate discussion.


About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Array ( [1364947200] => Array ( [startdate] => April 03, 2013 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh St., Philadelphia [title] => Capital of the World: Philadelphia’s Race to Host the United Nations [content] =>

Co-Sponsored Event: How close did Philadelphia come to becoming the Capital of the World?

Join the Philadelphia History Museum for the next event in its popular Conversations series. This program, presented in conjunction with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, will explore Capital of the World: The Race to the Host the United Nations, the newly published book by Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers-Camden, and a co-recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism. With a sweeping view of the United States’ place in the world at the end of World War II, the book tells the dramatic, surprising, and at times comic story of hometown promoters in pursuit of an extraordinary prize and the diplomats who struggled with the balance of power at a pivotal moment in history. Mires will delve into the fascinating account of Philadelphia's involvement in the national competition to house the UN headquarters.

This event will be recorded for C-Span's Book TV. Visitors are invited to view the Museum's exhibitions from 5:00-6:00 p.m. The program begins promptly at 6:00 p.m., with a reception, including music from the 1940's and book signing.  Books will be available for purchase. Reception made possible by the NYU Press.

Free and open to the public.  Please register in advance.

Click here for more information or to register.

Teachers attending this event may register for Act 48 credits through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

[time] => 5-7 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/capital-of-the-world-philadelphias-race-to-host-the-united-nations/ [links] => ) [1366761600] => Array ( [startdate] => April 24, 2013 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh St., Philadelphia [title] => Still Philadelphia: A Photographic History [content] =>

This year marks the thirtieth anniversary of the publication of Still Philadelphia: A Photographic History, 1890-1940, one of the most acclaimed and successful photographic history books of the past generation. Compiled and written by Fredric M. Miller, Morris J. Vogel and Allen F. Davis, Still Philadelphia—which stands out as one of the best selling book’s in Temple University Press’s history—still shapes how the region’s history is told, while inspiring a new generation of social historians and photographers. The 2013 Fredric M. Miller Lecture joins with Temple University’s New Philadelphia History Forum in organizing a presentation of the book on April 24, 5-7:30 p.m. at the Philadelphia History Museum, 15 South Seventh Street, Philadelphia, 19106. Morris J. Vogel (President, Lower East Side Tenement Museum) and Allen F. Davis (Professor Emeritus, Temple University) will be joined by Philadelphia Inquirer metropolitan photography editor Cheryl Shugars for a roundtable discussion on the book’s legacy, the origins of the project, and the role of photography in shaping urban memory.

Free and open to the public. Museum galleries open for viewing at 5 p.m. Wine and cheese reception begins at 5:30 p.m.

All available seats for this program have been taken, but if you add your name to the waiting list, you will be notified if spaces become available: http://miller2013nphf.eventbrite.com/

The Fredric M. Miller Lecture in Public History is administered by the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at Rutgers-Camden. The New Philadelphia History Forum, now in its second year, is an annual public discussion of the emerging scholarship of the region’s history.

[time] => 5-7 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/still-philadelphia-a-photographic-history/ [links] => ) [1379116800] => Array ( [startdate] => September 14, 2013 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Meet at Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh St., Philadelphia [title] => Living in the Industrial Neighborhood: Philadelphia’s Harrowgate Section (Walking Encyclopedia Tour) [content] =>

Visit Philadelphia's industrial past and explore the changing landscape and communities of an industrial neighborhood on this walking tour presented by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Meet at the Philadelphia History Museum to join the Encyclopedia's tour project manager, Jacob Downs (M.A., Rutgers-Camden), for a short trip on the Market-Frankford El to the Tioga Street Station and the Harrowgate neighborhood, once a center for dye works, carpet mills, and other textile mills, and one of the most densely populated working-class areas of Philadelphia.

Drawing upon the work of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia's authors and editors, the tour offers an opportunity to engage with important questions about the dramatic changes that Harrowgate and similar neighborhoods have experienced in the past two centuries. Why did the characteristics of the neighborhood's population shift so dramatically in the twentieth century? What defines community, and what happens when community institutions are lost? Does a neighborhood need churches, banks, schools, and playgrounds to develop community? Why are some sections of the city experiencing problems with crime, poverty, and poor education, while others are being revitalized?

On a walk of about one mile, the tour will highlight the neighborhood's industrial past with visits to the former Richardson’s Mints factory and Luithlien Dye House. Along the way, we also will explore the meaning of community by examining the two major parishes in the area, St. Joan of Arc and Ascension of our Lord, and the ways they were affected by the neighborhood's changing changing demographics in the mid-twentieth century. The tour will move north toward the Sheridan Middle School and end with a walk through the Kensington and Allegheny (K & A) section, where signs of community from the past mingle with the present.

There is no charge for this tour, but space is limited. Please register in advance at http://harrowgatetour.eventbrite.com/.

This Walking Encyclopedia Tour is presented by the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, a civic project to increase understanding of the city and region, and administered by the Philadelphia History Museum. This project is made possible by the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage.

[time] => 1-3:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/living-in-the-industrial-neighborhood-philadelphias-harrowgate-section-walking-encyclopedia-tour/ [links] => ) [1411804800] => Array ( [startdate] => September 27, 2014 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Center City Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: The Great Twelve-Hour, River to River, Vine to Pine, Rain or Shine Tour of Philadelphia [content] =>

Saturday, September 27, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

Join the Association of Philadelphia Tour Guides (APT) for this free guided walking tour to celebrate Philadelphia's wealth of cultural, historic and visitor sites. The event begins at 8 a.m. in the historic area, continues in four 2 ½ hour phases and ends at 7:30 pm at the Schuylkill River. Participants can elect to walk the entire tour, or join any phase. The Great Tour is free, but advance registration is highly recommended to ensure that there are enough guides for all phases of the tour. Registration instructions and added information on the tour are available on the APT website.

[time] => 8 a.m.-8 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-the-great-twelve-hour-river-to-river-vine-to-pine-rain-or-shine-tour-of-philadelphia/ [links] => ) [1413999000] => Array ( [startdate] => October 22, 2014 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn [content] =>

Wednesday, October 22, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia History Museum

Join us at the Philadelphia History Museum for conversation with Jean R. Soderlund, author of the new book Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn, and a film screening by History Making Productions.

About the book:
Lenape Country is a sweeping narrative history of the multi­ethnic society of the Delaware Valley in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. After Swanendael, the Natives, Swedes, and Finns avoided war by focusing on trade and forging strategic alliances in such events as the Dutch conquest, the Mercurius affair, the Long Swede conspiracy, and English attempts to seize land. Drawing on a wide range of sources, author Jean R. Soderlund demonstrates that the hallmarks of Delaware Valley society—commitment to personal freedom, religious liberty, peaceful resolution of conflict, and opposition to hierarchical government—began in the Delaware Valley not with Quaker ideals or the leadership of William Penn but with the Lenape Indians, whose culture played a key role in shaping Delaware Valley society.

Jean R. Soderlund is Professor of History at Lehigh University and editor of William Penn and the Founding of Pennsylvania: A Documentary History. She is an associate editor of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.

About the film:
A Lost World, the sixth episode of the documentary series Philadelphia: The Great Experiment by History Making Productions tells the story of Philadelphia between 1600-1680.

The program is FREE to Museum Members. $10 General Public. Pre-registration is requested. Books will be available for purchase.

Register today!

[time] => 5:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-lenape-country-delaware-valley-society-before-william-penn/ [links] => ) [1414627200] => Array ( [startdate] => October 30, 2014 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => National Mechanics Philadelphia Bar & Restaurant, 22 S. Third Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Philadelphia History Quizzo [content] =>

Thursday, October 30, 7-9 p.m.
National Mechanics Philadelphia Bar & Restaurant

Think you know Philadelphia history? Test your knowledge of the City of Brotherly Love in this special pub quiz organized by the Delaware Valley Archivists Group as the capstone event of Archives Month Philly. Questions plumbed from the annals of our city’s past by your friendly local archivists will challenge you to recall the people, places, and events that make Philadelphia unique. For more information, link to the website of Archives Month Philly.

[time] => 7-9 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-philadelphia-history-quizzo/ [links] => ) [1415687400] => Array ( [startdate] => November 11, 2014 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Leaving the Emerald Isle: Trials and Tribulations of Irish Immigrants in 19th-Century Philadelphia [content] =>

Tuesday, November 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania

During the mid 19th century, large numbers of Irish citizens made the perilous journey to America with the the hopes of escaping poverty, famine, and oppression. As thousands of immigrants made Philadelphia their home, they were met with religious and ethnic prejudices.  Moderated by Charlene Mires, professor of History at Rutgers-Camden and editor-in-chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, a panel of experts will examine the challenges and issues faced by the Irish as they struggled to integrate into American society.  A reception and performance of traditional Irish music will follow. For complete information, link to the event website at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

Speaker Bios:

Dr. William Watson is a professor of History at Immaculata University and Director of the Duffy's Cut Project. He's the author of  numerous articles and worked on several  books including: The Irish-Americans: The History and Culture of a People (forthcoming, ABC-Clio, November, 2014), The Ghosts of Duffy's Cut (Praeger, 2006), Tricolor and Crescent: France and the Islamic World, and The Collapse of Communism in the Soviet Union (Greenwood, 1998).

Zachary Schragg is a professor of history at George Mason University and the author of two books, The Great Society Subway: A History of the Washington Metro and Ethical Imperialism: Institutional Review Boards and the Social Sciences, 1965-2009, both published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. He is currently working on a narrative history of the Philadelphia riots of 1844 and contributed the essay on this topic for The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.

Michael Johnson graduated summa cum laude from the University of Notre Dame in 2012 with a degree in History, United States concentration. While at Notre Dame he was a member of Phi Alpha Theta, the history national honor society, Phi Beta Kappa, a national academic honor society, and also served as a Gilder Lehrman History Scholar. His honors thesis “‘Be Patriots Because You Have a Country’: The Fenian Brotherhood and Irish-American Identity in Civil War-Era Philadelphia” received the University’s O’Hagan Award for best essay on Irish history. He is presently pursuing a Master’s Degree in History, United States concentration at Villanova University. His interests include nineteenth century United States History and the Civil War era, particularly questions of race, ethnicity, and identity. He is currently working with Dr. Judith Giesberg and two fellow students on a study of the Institute for Colored Youth, an elite school for African American children in nineteenth century Philadelphia.

James Kopaczewski graduated from St. Joseph’s University in 2013 with a B.A. in History and International Relations. While at St. Joseph’s, Jim was a member of Phi Alpha Theta and served as a Summer Scholar where he researched Irish immigration to the United States in the early 19th century. Following graduation, he switched sides in the Holy War and made the short move up Lancaster Avenue to Villanova. At Villanova, he is a second year M.A. student whose concentration is in United States History with an emphasis on the Civil War Era. He is also interested in the Union home front in the Civil War, masculinity in the 19th century, and Irish-American studies.

Charlene Mires is the Director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities and Professor of History at Rutgers-Camden, where she teaches courses in public, urban, and U.S. history. She is the author of Independence Hall in American Memory (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002), which received the Philadelphia Athenaeum Literary Award; Capital of the World: The Race to Host the United Nations (NYU Press, 2013); as well as articles in The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Pennsylvania History, The Public Historian, and other journals. As a journalist, she was a co-winner of the Pulitzer Prize for general local reporting awarded to the staff of the Fort Wayne (Ind.) News-Sentinel in 1983 for coverage of the floods that ravaged that city in 1982.

[time] => 6:30-8:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-leaving-the-emerald-isle-trials-and-tribulations-of-irish-immigrants-in-19th-century-philadelphia/ [links] => ) [1423699200] => Array ( [startdate] => February 12, 2015 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia. [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? The Abolitionists [content] =>

Created Equal? The Abolitionists: Radicals. Agitators. Troublemakers. Liberators.

Thursday, February 12, 2015, 6-7:30pm
Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent
15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free.
Pre-registration is requested.

Beginning in the 1830s, several religious, social, and political reform movements swept through the United States. Among the men and women leading these reforms were abolitionists who fought to end slavery, an institution they believed to be incompatible with the founding principles of the nation.

The Philadelphia History Museum invites you to a screening of The Abolitionists, a documentary film vividly bringing to life the struggles of these ordinary men and women - black and white, enslaved and free – that culminated in the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment. Through innovative use of reenactments, this three-episode series puts a face on the anti-slavery movement—or rather, five faces: William Lloyd Garrison, impassioned New England newspaper editor; Frederick Douglass, former slave, author, and activist; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the enormously influential Uncle Tom’s Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. The film’s release in 2013 also marked the 150th anniversary of the Proclamation.

Dr. Lawrence Little, Associate Professor of History at Villanova University, will discuss how the issues and themes raised in the film relate to current events. Objects from PHM’s collections will be on display during the program, including a “free labor” girl’s dress circa 1840s. 

About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum,  and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

[time] => 6-7:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-created-equal-the-abolitionists/ [links] => ) [1424908800] => Array ( [startdate] => February 26, 2015 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => African American Museum in Philadelphia, 701 Arch Street [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? Slavery by Another Name [content] =>

Created Equal? Slavery By Another Name: Past and Present Ideas of “Dangerous Blackness”

Thursday, February 26, 2015, 6- 7:30pm
African American Museum in Philadelphia
701 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free.

By 1865, despite the promise of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Thirteenth Amendment, and the Confederate defeat in the Civil War, many former slaves did not in reality experience “a new birth of freedom.” It was a shocking reality often unacknowledged, then and now: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted until the second world war.

The African American Museum in Philadelphia invites you to a screening of Slavery By Another Name. Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subjected to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor. Interviews with the descendants of victims and perpetrators resonate with a modern audience. Christina Comer, who discovered how her family profited from the system, says that “the story is important no matter how painful the reality is.”

Working with Emahunn Campbell, PhD Student in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at University of Massachusetts Amherst, the African American Museum in Philadelphia  will also explore conceptions of African American criminality in the late 19th Century and the present day, using Slavery By Another Name as a guiding source. Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, will faciliate discussion.

Slavery by Another Name: Jon Van Amber and Omni Studio

About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopdia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

[time] => 6-7:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-created-equal-slavery-by-another-name/ [links] => ) [1426118400] => Array ( [startdate] => March 12, 2015 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? The Loving Story: Who Decides Who Marries Whom [content] =>

Thursday, March 12, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania
1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free

In this program of the Created Equal? series, we will view clips from The Loving Story and consider legal battles over the question of who can get married and who gets to decide.

The documentary explores the experiences of Mildred and Richard Loving. While they knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia - because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white -  they never expected to be woken up in their bedroom and arrested one night in 1958. The documentary brings to life the Lovings’ marriage and the legal battle that followed through little-known filmed interviews and photographs shot for Life magazine.

Regina Austin, William A. Schnader Professor of Law and Director, Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law, will  provide context and discuss the precedent set by this case for the recent state and federal court battles over gay marriage.  Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will then facilitate discussion.


About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

[time] => 6-7:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/created-equal-the-loving-story-who-decides-who-marries-whom/ [links] => ) )

Archived Events

  • March 12, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? The Loving Story: Who Decides Who Marries Whom

    Thursday, March 12, 2015, 67:30 p.m.
    Historical Society of Pennsylvania
    1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia
    Admission Free

    In this program of the Created Equal? series, we will view clips from The Loving Story and consider legal battles over the question of who can get married and who gets to decide.

    The documentary explores the experiences of Mildred and Richard Loving. While they knew it was technically illegal for them to live as a married couple in Virginia – because she was of African American and Native American descent and he was white –  they never expected to be woken up in their bedroom and arrested one night in 1958. The documentary brings to life the Lovings’ marriage and the legal battle that followed through little-known filmed interviews and photographs shot for Life magazine.

    Regina Austin, William A. Schnader Professor of Law and Director, Penn Program on Documentaries & the Law, will  provide context and discuss the precedent set by this case for the recent state and federal court battles over gay marriage.  Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will then facilitate discussion.


    About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

    To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

    The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

    The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


    Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • February 26, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? Slavery by Another Name

    Created Equal? Slavery By Another Name: Past and Present Ideas of “Dangerous Blackness”

    Thursday, February 26, 2015, 67:30pm
    African American Museum in Philadelphia
    701 Arch Street, Philadelphia
    Admission Free.

    By 1865, despite the promise of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Thirteenth Amendment, and the Confederate defeat in the Civil War, many former slaves did not in reality experience “a new birth of freedom.” It was a shocking reality often unacknowledged, then and now: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted until the second world war.

    The African American Museum in Philadelphia invites you to a screening of Slavery By Another Name. Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning book by Douglas Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name tells the stories of men, charged with crimes like vagrancy, and often guilty of nothing, who were bought and sold, abused, and subjected to sometimes deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor. Interviews with the descendants of victims and perpetrators resonate with a modern audience. Christina Comer, who discovered how her family profited from the system, says that “the story is important no matter how painful the reality is.”

    Working with Emahunn Campbell, PhD Student in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at University of Massachusetts Amherst, the African American Museum in Philadelphia  will also explore conceptions of African American criminality in the late 19th Century and the present day, using Slavery By Another Name as a guiding source. Dr. Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers University-Camden,  director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, and  editor of the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, will faciliate discussion.

    Slavery by Another Name: Jon Van Amber and Omni Studio

    About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

    To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopdia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

    The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

    The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


    Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.


    Location: African American Museum in Philadelphia, 701 Arch Street

  • February 12, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? The Abolitionists

    Created Equal? The Abolitionists: Radicals. Agitators. Troublemakers. Liberators.

    Thursday, February 12, 2015, 6-7:30pm
    Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater Kent
    15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia
    Admission Free.
    Pre-registration is requested.

    Beginning in the 1830s, several religious, social, and political reform movements swept through the United States. Among the men and women leading these reforms were abolitionists who fought to end slavery, an institution they believed to be incompatible with the founding principles of the nation.

    The Philadelphia History Museum invites you to a screening of The Abolitionists, a documentary film vividly bringing to life the struggles of these ordinary men and women – black and white, enslaved and free – that culminated in the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment. Through innovative use of reenactments, this three-episode series puts a face on the anti-slavery movement—or rather, five faces: William Lloyd Garrison, impassioned New England newspaper editor; Frederick Douglass, former slave, author, and activist; Angelina Grimké, daughter of a rich South Carolina slaveholder; Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the enormously influential Uncle Tom’s Cabin; and John Brown, ultimately executed for his armed seizure of the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. The film’s release in 2013 also marked the 150th anniversary of the Proclamation.

    Dr. Lawrence Little, Associate Professor of History at Villanova University, will discuss how the issues and themes raised in the film relate to current events. Objects from PHM’s collections will be on display during the program, including a “free labor” girl’s dress circa 1840s. 

    About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

    To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the 13th Amendment, The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum,  and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

    The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

    The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


    Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.


    Location: Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia.

  • November 11, 2014, 6:30-8:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Leaving the Emerald Isle: Trials and Tribulations of Irish Immigrants in 19th-Century Philadelphia

    Tuesday, November 11, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
    Historical Society of Pennsylvania

    During the mid 19th century, large numbers of Irish citizens made the perilous journey to America with the the hopes of escaping poverty, famine, and oppression. As thousands of immigrants made Philadelphia their home, they were met with religious and ethnic prejudices.  Moderated by Charlene Mires, professor of History at Rutgers-Camden and editor-in-chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, a panel of experts will examine the challenges and issues faced by the Irish as they struggled to integrate into American society.  A reception and performance of traditional Irish music will follow. For complete information, link to the event website at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

    Speaker Bios:

    Dr. William Watson is a professor of History at Immaculata University and Director of the Duffy’s Cut Project. He’s the author of  numerous articles and worked on several  books including: The Irish-Americans: The History and Culture of a People (forthcoming, ABC-Clio, November, 2014), The Ghosts of Duffy’s Cut (Praeger, 2006), Tricolor and Crescent: France and the Islamic World, and The Collapse of Communism in the Soviet Union (Greenwood, 1998).

    Zachary Schragg is a professor of history at George Mason University and the author of two books, The Great Society Subway: A History of the Washington Metro and Ethical Imperialism: Institutional Review Boards and the Social Sciences, 1965-2009, both published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. He is currently working on a narrative history of the Philadelphia riots of 1844 and contributed the essay on this topic for The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.

    Michael Johnson graduated summa cum laude from the University of Notre Dame in 2012 with a degree in History, United States concentration. While at Notre Dame he was a member of Phi Alpha Theta, the history national honor society, Phi Beta Kappa, a national academic honor society, and also served as a Gilder Lehrman History Scholar. His honors thesis “‘Be Patriots Because You Have a Country’: The Fenian Brotherhood and Irish-American Identity in Civil War-Era Philadelphia” received the University’s O’Hagan Award for best essay on Irish history. He is presently pursuing a Master’s Degree in History, United States concentration at Villanova University. His interests include nineteenth century United States History and the Civil War era, particularly questions of race, ethnicity, and identity. He is currently working with Dr. Judith Giesberg and two fellow students on a study of the Institute for Colored Youth, an elite school for African American children in nineteenth century Philadelphia.

    James Kopaczewski graduated from St. Joseph’s University in 2013 with a B.A. in History and International Relations. While at St. Joseph’s, Jim was a member of Phi Alpha Theta and served as a Summer Scholar where he researched Irish immigration to the United States in the early 19th century. Following graduation, he switched sides in the Holy War and made the short move up Lancaster Avenue to Villanova. At Villanova, he is a second year M.A. student whose concentration is in United States History with an emphasis on the Civil War Era. He is also interested in the Union home front in the Civil War, masculinity in the 19th century, and Irish-American studies.

    Charlene Mires is the Director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities and Professor of History at Rutgers-Camden, where she teaches courses in public, urban, and U.S. history. She is the author of Independence Hall in American Memory (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2002), which received the Philadelphia Athenaeum Literary Award; Capital of the World: The Race to Host the United Nations (NYU Press, 2013); as well as articles in The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Pennsylvania History, The Public Historian, and other journals. As a journalist, she was a co-winner of the Pulitzer Prize for general local reporting awarded to the staff of the Fort Wayne (Ind.) News-Sentinel in 1983 for coverage of the floods that ravaged that city in 1982.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • October 30, 2014, 7-9 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Philadelphia History Quizzo

    Thursday, October 30, 7-9 p.m.
    National Mechanics Philadelphia Bar & Restaurant

    Think you know Philadelphia history? Test your knowledge of the City of Brotherly Love in this special pub quiz organized by the Delaware Valley Archivists Group as the capstone event of Archives Month Philly. Questions plumbed from the annals of our city’s past by your friendly local archivists will challenge you to recall the people, places, and events that make Philadelphia unique. For more information, link to the website of Archives Month Philly.


    Location: National Mechanics Philadelphia Bar & Restaurant, 22 S. Third Street, Philadelphia

  • October 22, 2014, 5:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn

    Wednesday, October 22, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
    Philadelphia History Museum

    Join us at the Philadelphia History Museum for conversation with Jean R. Soderlund, author of the new book Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn, and a film screening by History Making Productions.

    About the book:
    Lenape Country is a sweeping narrative history of the multi­ethnic society of the Delaware Valley in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. After Swanendael, the Natives, Swedes, and Finns avoided war by focusing on trade and forging strategic alliances in such events as the Dutch conquest, the Mercurius affair, the Long Swede conspiracy, and English attempts to seize land. Drawing on a wide range of sources, author Jean R. Soderlund demonstrates that the hallmarks of Delaware Valley society—commitment to personal freedom, religious liberty, peaceful resolution of conflict, and opposition to hierarchical government—began in the Delaware Valley not with Quaker ideals or the leadership of William Penn but with the Lenape Indians, whose culture played a key role in shaping Delaware Valley society.

    Jean R. Soderlund is Professor of History at Lehigh University and editor of William Penn and the Founding of Pennsylvania: A Documentary History. She is an associate editor of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.

    About the film:
    A Lost World, the sixth episode of the documentary series Philadelphia: The Great Experiment by History Making Productions tells the story of Philadelphia between 1600-1680.

    The program is FREE to Museum Members. $10 General Public. Pre-registration is requested. Books will be available for purchase.

    Register today!


    Location: Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh Street, Philadelphia

  • September 27, 2014, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: The Great Twelve-Hour, River to River, Vine to Pine, Rain or Shine Tour of Philadelphia

    Saturday, September 27, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

    Join the Association of Philadelphia Tour Guides (APT) for this free guided walking tour to celebrate Philadelphia’s wealth of cultural, historic and visitor sites. The event begins at 8 a.m. in the historic area, continues in four 2 ½ hour phases and ends at 7:30 pm at the Schuylkill River. Participants can elect to walk the entire tour, or join any phase. The Great Tour is free, but advance registration is highly recommended to ensure that there are enough guides for all phases of the tour. Registration instructions and added information on the tour are available on the APT website.


    Location: Center City Philadelphia

  • September 14, 2013, 1-3:30 p.m.—Living in the Industrial Neighborhood: Philadelphia’s Harrowgate Section (Walking Encyclopedia Tour)

    Visit Philadelphia’s industrial past and explore the changing landscape and communities of an industrial neighborhood on this walking tour presented by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Meet at the Philadelphia History Museum to join the Encyclopedia’s tour project manager, Jacob Downs (M.A., Rutgers-Camden), for a short trip on the Market-Frankford El to the Tioga Street Station and the Harrowgate neighborhood, once a center for dye works, carpet mills, and other textile mills, and one of the most densely populated working-class areas of Philadelphia.

    Drawing upon the work of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia’s authors and editors, the tour offers an opportunity to engage with important questions about the dramatic changes that Harrowgate and similar neighborhoods have experienced in the past two centuries. Why did the characteristics of the neighborhood’s population shift so dramatically in the twentieth century? What defines community, and what happens when community institutions are lost? Does a neighborhood need churches, banks, schools, and playgrounds to develop community? Why are some sections of the city experiencing problems with crime, poverty, and poor education, while others are being revitalized?

    On a walk of about one mile, the tour will highlight the neighborhood’s industrial past with visits to the former Richardson’s Mints factory and Luithlien Dye House. Along the way, we also will explore the meaning of community by examining the two major parishes in the area, St. Joan of Arc and Ascension of our Lord, and the ways they were affected by the neighborhood’s changing changing demographics in the mid-twentieth century. The tour will move north toward the Sheridan Middle School and end with a walk through the Kensington and Allegheny (K & A) section, where signs of community from the past mingle with the present.

    There is no charge for this tour, but space is limited. Please register in advance at http://harrowgatetour.eventbrite.com/.

    This Walking Encyclopedia Tour is presented by the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, a civic project to increase understanding of the city and region, and administered by the Philadelphia History Museum. This project is made possible by the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage.


    Location: Meet at Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh St., Philadelphia

  • April 24, 2013, 5-7 p.m.—Still Philadelphia: A Photographic History

    This year marks the thirtieth anniversary of the publication of Still Philadelphia: A Photographic History, 1890-1940, one of the most acclaimed and successful photographic history books of the past generation. Compiled and written by Fredric M. Miller, Morris J. Vogel and Allen F. Davis, Still Philadelphia—which stands out as one of the best selling book’s in Temple University Press’s history—still shapes how the region’s history is told, while inspiring a new generation of social historians and photographers. The 2013 Fredric M. Miller Lecture joins with Temple University’s New Philadelphia History Forum in organizing a presentation of the book on April 24, 5-7:30 p.m. at the Philadelphia History Museum, 15 South Seventh Street, Philadelphia, 19106. Morris J. Vogel (President, Lower East Side Tenement Museum) and Allen F. Davis (Professor Emeritus, Temple University) will be joined by Philadelphia Inquirer metropolitan photography editor Cheryl Shugars for a roundtable discussion on the book’s legacy, the origins of the project, and the role of photography in shaping urban memory.

    Free and open to the public. Museum galleries open for viewing at 5 p.m. Wine and cheese reception begins at 5:30 p.m.

    All available seats for this program have been taken, but if you add your name to the waiting list, you will be notified if spaces become available: http://miller2013nphf.eventbrite.com/

    The Fredric M. Miller Lecture in Public History is administered by the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at Rutgers-Camden. The New Philadelphia History Forum, now in its second year, is an annual public discussion of the emerging scholarship of the region’s history.


    Location: Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh St., Philadelphia

  • April 03, 2013, 5-7 p.m.—Capital of the World: Philadelphia’s Race to Host the United Nations

    Co-Sponsored Event: How close did Philadelphia come to becoming the Capital of the World?

    Join the Philadelphia History Museum for the next event in its popular Conversations series. This program, presented in conjunction with the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, will explore Capital of the World: The Race to the Host the United Nations, the newly published book by Charlene Mires, Associate Professor of History at Rutgers-Camden, and a co-recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in Journalism. With a sweeping view of the United States’ place in the world at the end of World War II, the book tells the dramatic, surprising, and at times comic story of hometown promoters in pursuit of an extraordinary prize and the diplomats who struggled with the balance of power at a pivotal moment in history. Mires will delve into the fascinating account of Philadelphia’s involvement in the national competition to house the UN headquarters.

    This event will be recorded for C-Span’s Book TV. Visitors are invited to view the Museum’s exhibitions from 5:00-6:00 p.m. The program begins promptly at 6:00 p.m., with a reception, including music from the 1940’s and book signing.  Books will be available for purchase. Reception made possible by the NYU Press.

    Free and open to the public.  Please register in advance.

    Click here for more information or to register.

    Teachers attending this event may register for Act 48 credits through the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.


    Location: Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh St., Philadelphia

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