Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia

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Tuesday, June 4, 2019, 6-8 p.m.
Philadelphia Lazaretto

Second Street and Wanamaker Avenue, Essington, Pa.
Advance registration recommended: Click here.

Explore the Philadelphia Lazaretto, one of the oldest quarantine stations in the United States, discover the critical role it played in Philadelphia’s immigration history, and contemplate the past, present, and future of health care for our most vulnerable.


About The Series
Sanctuaries: Past into Present

Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

This spring, join friends and neighbors for "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present," a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape.

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Tuesday, April 23, 6-8 p.m.
Arch Street Meeting
320 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Advance registration recommended: Click here.

Learn how the idea of “sanctuary” became part of immigration justice lexicon in the United States and what we can all learn from the experiences of refugees and activists, past and present.



About the Series, "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present"

Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

This spring, join friends and neighbors for "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present," a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape.

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Tuesday, April 2
Campus Center, Rutgers-Camden
7 p.m. lecture, preceded by exhibits beginning at 6 p.m.
Advance registration recommended: Click here.
 
For more than a decade, archaeologist Dr. Cheryl LaRoche has been researching and physically exploring the landscapes of eighteenth and nineteenth century free Black communities, their churches, cemeteries and institutions, and their relationship to the Underground Railroad. Dr. LaRoche will share her most recent findings and make connections with the history of South Jersey, particularly the AME Church.  Prior to the lecture, community organizations and individuals are invited to create exhibits of their Underground Railroad documents, artifacts, and stories.  Dr. LaRoche's book, Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance, will be available for sale and signing at the end of the program.
 
The lecture will begin at 7 p.m., preceded by community exhibits beginning at 6 p.m.
 
Program supported by the Office of the Chancellor.  Co-Sponsoring departments and programs: History, Africana Studies, Forensic Science, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH), and The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.
 

First in a Series, "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present"

Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

This spring, join friends and neighbors for "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present," a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape. The next program in the series is: "Sanctuary Now, Sanctuary When?" Tuesday, April 23, 6-8 p.m., Arch Street Meeting, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia.

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Lecture and Book Signing
Friday, April 27, 7-9 p.m.
Arch Street Meeting House, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia
$10 suggested donation, RSVP and/or reserve a book here.

Sit back and relax on 200+ year-old Quaker benches while historian Gary B. Nash talks about his new book, Warner Mifflin: Unflinching Quaker Abolitionist. This event is sponsored by Arch Street Meeting House Preservation Trust and includes a lecture by the author, Q&A, book signing, light refreshments, and access to the Trust's new exhibit space. Tickets are $10 (suggested donation). Copies of the book will be available for purchase. These can be reserved online in advance for pick up at the event.

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Rutgers-Camden, Armitage Hall, Third Floor Faculty Lounge
Friday, February 16, 12:30-1:45 p.m.
CURE Seminar Series, free and open to the public.

Philadelphia exploded in violence in 1910. The general strike that year claimed the lives of some two dozen people and made Philadelphia a prominent point in the tumultuous national conflict over workers’ rights. That strike was a notable point, but not a unique one, in the history of Philadelphia’s transit system. In “Running the Rails: A History of Capital and Labor in the Philadelphia Transit Industry,” James Wolfinger outlines the chief arguments of his recent book, Running the Rails (Cornell University Press, 2016), which details a generations-long history of conflict between the workers and management at one of the nation’s largest privately owned transit systems. In particular, he focuses on how labor relations shifted from the 1880s to the 1960s as transit workers adapted to fast-paced technological innovation to keep the city’s people and commerce on the move while management sought to limit its employees’ rights. He argues that it is remarkable to see how much Philadelphia’s transit workers achieved.

James Wolfinger, author of essays about African American Civil Rights and African American Migration in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, holds a joint appointment in History and Education at DePaul University where he is a professor and also associate dean in the College of Education. He is the author of Running the Rails: Capital and Labor in the Philadelphia Transit Industry (Cornell University Press, 2016) and Philadelphia Divided: Race and Politics in the City of Brotherly Love (UNC Press, 2007) as well as numerous articles and reviews that have appeared in the Journal of Urban History, Labor, Pennsylvania History, Journal of American History, and American Historical Review.

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Historical Society of Pennsylvania, November 16, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Delve into the historical background of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor and discuss the event’s continuing impact on American public memory with West Chester University's Robert Kodosky, author of the "Veterans and Veterans' Organizations" essay in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.  The event is free for members of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania; $10 for nonmembers. For additional information, link to the event announcement by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

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Athenaeum of Philadelphia, November 2, 2016, 5:30 p.m.

As controversial as immigration policy has been in the current national election, Philadelphia, like many older American cities, credits immigrants with boosting the city’s population in the twenty-first century after decades of decline. These newcomers are but one wave of many over generations that have left their mark on the character of the region. Yet few area residents are aware of either the diversity or the location of immigrant settlement over the years, let alone what their impact has been in changing neighborhoods like South Philadelphia or towns throughout the metropolitan area. Illustrating their contribution to community-based knowledge in a changing media environment, editors and authors of the The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will show how this form of scholarship can address even the most contentious of contemporary issues.

Panelists include Charlene Mires, Professor of History at Rutgers-Camden and author of Independence Hall in American Memory; Domenic Vitiello, Associate Professor of City Planning and Urban Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and author of a forthcoming book on recent immigration to the Philadelphia area; Caroline Golab, Associate Dean, Academic & Student Affairs, Thomas Jefferson University; and Howard Gillette, Professor Emeritus of History at Rutgers-Camden and author of Camden after the Fall.

This event has received generous support from the Henry Paul Busch Fund.

Reception to follow.

Athenaeum Members: Free.  RSVP by calling 215-925-2688 or emailing events@philaathenaeum.org
Non-Members: $10

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Join us at the Philadelphia History Museum on Thursday, September 22, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. for a conversation about the history and significance of Philadelphia's Jewelers Row.  Speakers will include Paul Steinke, Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia; Hy Goldberg, Jewelers Row Business Association; Bob Skiba, Association of Philadelphia Tour Guides; and representatives from Visit Philadelphia.  The program is free, but registration is required. Click here to register.

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Philadelphia boasts one of the oldest, largest and most diverse park systems in the United States. Yet the city’s parks receive scant attention in histories of landscape design and city planning. In Counting Trees: The Search for Fairmount Park, Elizabeth Milroy, author of The Grid and the River: Philadelphia’s Green Places, 1682-1876, will describe the development of Philadelphia’s urban parks in the two centuries after William Penn and Thomas Holme drew public squares on the seminal city plan.

This program is FREE but registration is required.

Elizabeth Milroy has contributed several essays to The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, including a history of Philadelphia's public parks.

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Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

Philadelphia’s Chinatown, like many urban Chinatowns, began in the late nineteenth century as a refuge for immigrant laborers and merchants in which to form a community to raise families and conduct business. But this enclave for expression, identity, and community is also the embodiment of historical legacies and personal and collective memories.

In her book Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown, Kathryn Wilson charts the unique history of this neighborhood, the community’s efforts to save and renew itself, and the continuing living community for subsequent waves of new immigration. Joining Dr. Wilson for this program at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will be  community members she interviewed for the Ethnic Renewal project, including Mary Yee, one of the leaders of the Save Chinatown movement, and John Chin, who grew up in the neighborhood and serves as executive director of Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation. After the presentation, examples from HSP collections representing Chinatown’s history will be on display for exploration and discussion.

Admission free. For further information visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania calendar.

Read Kathryn Wilson's essay about Chinatown in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia: link here.

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Tuesday, June 4, 2019, 6-8 p.m.
Philadelphia Lazaretto

Second Street and Wanamaker Avenue, Essington, Pa.
Advance registration recommended: Click here.

Explore the Philadelphia Lazaretto, one of the oldest quarantine stations in the United States, discover the critical role it played in Philadelphia’s immigration history, and contemplate the past, present, and future of health care for our most vulnerable.


About The Series
Sanctuaries: Past into Present

Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

This spring, join friends and neighbors for "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present," a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape.

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Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

Philadelphia’s Chinatown, like many urban Chinatowns, began in the late nineteenth century as a refuge for immigrant laborers and merchants in which to form a community to raise families and conduct business. But this enclave for expression, identity, and community is also the embodiment of historical legacies and personal and collective memories.

In her book Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown, Kathryn Wilson charts the unique history of this neighborhood, the community’s efforts to save and renew itself, and the continuing living community for subsequent waves of new immigration. Joining Dr. Wilson for this program at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will be  community members she interviewed for the Ethnic Renewal project, including Mary Yee, one of the leaders of the Save Chinatown movement, and John Chin, who grew up in the neighborhood and serves as executive director of Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation. After the presentation, examples from HSP collections representing Chinatown’s history will be on display for exploration and discussion.

Admission free. For further information visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania calendar.

Read Kathryn Wilson's essay about Chinatown in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia: link here.

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Philadelphia boasts one of the oldest, largest and most diverse park systems in the United States. Yet the city’s parks receive scant attention in histories of landscape design and city planning. In Counting Trees: The Search for Fairmount Park, Elizabeth Milroy, author of The Grid and the River: Philadelphia’s Green Places, 1682-1876, will describe the development of Philadelphia’s urban parks in the two centuries after William Penn and Thomas Holme drew public squares on the seminal city plan.

This program is FREE but registration is required.

Elizabeth Milroy has contributed several essays to The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, including a history of Philadelphia's public parks.

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Join us at the Philadelphia History Museum on Thursday, September 22, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. for a conversation about the history and significance of Philadelphia's Jewelers Row.  Speakers will include Paul Steinke, Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia; Hy Goldberg, Jewelers Row Business Association; Bob Skiba, Association of Philadelphia Tour Guides; and representatives from Visit Philadelphia.  The program is free, but registration is required. Click here to register.

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Athenaeum of Philadelphia, November 2, 2016, 5:30 p.m.

As controversial as immigration policy has been in the current national election, Philadelphia, like many older American cities, credits immigrants with boosting the city’s population in the twenty-first century after decades of decline. These newcomers are but one wave of many over generations that have left their mark on the character of the region. Yet few area residents are aware of either the diversity or the location of immigrant settlement over the years, let alone what their impact has been in changing neighborhoods like South Philadelphia or towns throughout the metropolitan area. Illustrating their contribution to community-based knowledge in a changing media environment, editors and authors of the The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will show how this form of scholarship can address even the most contentious of contemporary issues.

Panelists include Charlene Mires, Professor of History at Rutgers-Camden and author of Independence Hall in American Memory; Domenic Vitiello, Associate Professor of City Planning and Urban Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and author of a forthcoming book on recent immigration to the Philadelphia area; Caroline Golab, Associate Dean, Academic & Student Affairs, Thomas Jefferson University; and Howard Gillette, Professor Emeritus of History at Rutgers-Camden and author of Camden after the Fall.

This event has received generous support from the Henry Paul Busch Fund.

Reception to follow.

Athenaeum Members: Free.  RSVP by calling 215-925-2688 or emailing events@philaathenaeum.org
Non-Members: $10

[time] => 5:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/partner-event-immigration-in-philadelphia/ [links] => ) [1479277800] => Array ( [startdate] => November 16, 2016 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Partner Event: “The Same Spirit of Patriotism and Sacrifice”: Pearl Harbor and the Erosion of Citizenship [content] =>

Historical Society of Pennsylvania, November 16, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

Delve into the historical background of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor and discuss the event’s continuing impact on American public memory with West Chester University's Robert Kodosky, author of the "Veterans and Veterans' Organizations" essay in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.  The event is free for members of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania; $10 for nonmembers. For additional information, link to the event announcement by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

[time] => 6:30-8:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/partner-event-the-same-spirit-of-patriotism-and-sacrifice-pearl-harbor-and-the-erosion-of-citizenship/ [links] => ) [1518779700] => Array ( [startdate] => February 16, 2018 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Rutgers-Camden [title] => Author Event: Running the Rails: A History of Capital and Labor in the Philadelphia Transit Industry [content] =>

Rutgers-Camden, Armitage Hall, Third Floor Faculty Lounge
Friday, February 16, 12:30-1:45 p.m.
CURE Seminar Series, free and open to the public.

Philadelphia exploded in violence in 1910. The general strike that year claimed the lives of some two dozen people and made Philadelphia a prominent point in the tumultuous national conflict over workers’ rights. That strike was a notable point, but not a unique one, in the history of Philadelphia’s transit system. In “Running the Rails: A History of Capital and Labor in the Philadelphia Transit Industry,” James Wolfinger outlines the chief arguments of his recent book, Running the Rails (Cornell University Press, 2016), which details a generations-long history of conflict between the workers and management at one of the nation’s largest privately owned transit systems. In particular, he focuses on how labor relations shifted from the 1880s to the 1960s as transit workers adapted to fast-paced technological innovation to keep the city’s people and commerce on the move while management sought to limit its employees’ rights. He argues that it is remarkable to see how much Philadelphia’s transit workers achieved.

James Wolfinger, author of essays about African American Civil Rights and African American Migration in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, holds a joint appointment in History and Education at DePaul University where he is a professor and also associate dean in the College of Education. He is the author of Running the Rails: Capital and Labor in the Philadelphia Transit Industry (Cornell University Press, 2016) and Philadelphia Divided: Race and Politics in the City of Brotherly Love (UNC Press, 2007) as well as numerous articles and reviews that have appeared in the Journal of Urban History, Labor, Pennsylvania History, Journal of American History, and American Historical Review.

[time] => 11:15 a.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/author-event-running-the-rails/ [links] => ) [1524787200] => Array ( [startdate] => April 27, 2018 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Arch Street Meeting House, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia [title] => Author Event: Warner Mifflin, Unflinching Quaker Abolitionist [content] =>

Lecture and Book Signing
Friday, April 27, 7-9 p.m.
Arch Street Meeting House, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia
$10 suggested donation, RSVP and/or reserve a book here.

Sit back and relax on 200+ year-old Quaker benches while historian Gary B. Nash talks about his new book, Warner Mifflin: Unflinching Quaker Abolitionist. This event is sponsored by Arch Street Meeting House Preservation Trust and includes a lecture by the author, Q&A, book signing, light refreshments, and access to the Trust's new exhibit space. Tickets are $10 (suggested donation). Copies of the book will be available for purchase. These can be reserved online in advance for pick up at the event.

[time] => 7-9 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/author-event-warner-mifflin-unflinching-quaker-abolitionist/ [links] => ) [1554163200] => Array ( [startdate] => April 02, 2019 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Campus Center, Rutgers-Camden [title] => In Search of the Underground Railroad: Connecting People, Places, and Things [content] =>
Tuesday, April 2
Campus Center, Rutgers-Camden
7 p.m. lecture, preceded by exhibits beginning at 6 p.m.
Advance registration recommended: Click here.
 
For more than a decade, archaeologist Dr. Cheryl LaRoche has been researching and physically exploring the landscapes of eighteenth and nineteenth century free Black communities, their churches, cemeteries and institutions, and their relationship to the Underground Railroad. Dr. LaRoche will share her most recent findings and make connections with the history of South Jersey, particularly the AME Church.  Prior to the lecture, community organizations and individuals are invited to create exhibits of their Underground Railroad documents, artifacts, and stories.  Dr. LaRoche's book, Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance, will be available for sale and signing at the end of the program.
 
The lecture will begin at 7 p.m., preceded by community exhibits beginning at 6 p.m.
 
Program supported by the Office of the Chancellor.  Co-Sponsoring departments and programs: History, Africana Studies, Forensic Science, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH), and The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.
 

First in a Series, "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present"

Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

This spring, join friends and neighbors for "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present," a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape. The next program in the series is: "Sanctuary Now, Sanctuary When?" Tuesday, April 23, 6-8 p.m., Arch Street Meeting, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia.

[time] => 6-8 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/in-search-of-the-underground-railroad-connecting-people-places-and-things/ [links] => ) [1555977600] => Array ( [startdate] => April 23, 2019 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Arch Street Meeting, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia [title] => Sanctuary Now, Sanctuary When? [content] =>

Tuesday, April 23, 6-8 p.m.
Arch Street Meeting
320 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Advance registration recommended: Click here.

Learn how the idea of “sanctuary” became part of immigration justice lexicon in the United States and what we can all learn from the experiences of refugees and activists, past and present.



About the Series, "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present"

Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

This spring, join friends and neighbors for "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present," a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape.

[time] => 6-8 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/sanctuary-now-sanctuary-when/ [links] => ) [1559606400] => Array ( [startdate] => June 04, 2019 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Philadelphia Lazaretto, Second Street and Wanamaker Avenue, Essington, Pa. [title] => Sanctuary in Sickness, Sanctuary in Health [content] =>

Tuesday, June 4, 2019, 6-8 p.m.
Philadelphia Lazaretto

Second Street and Wanamaker Avenue, Essington, Pa.
Advance registration recommended: Click here.

Explore the Philadelphia Lazaretto, one of the oldest quarantine stations in the United States, discover the critical role it played in Philadelphia’s immigration history, and contemplate the past, present, and future of health care for our most vulnerable.


About The Series
Sanctuaries: Past into Present

Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

This spring, join friends and neighbors for "Sanctuaries: Past Into Present," a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape.

[time] => 6-8 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/sanctuary-in-sickness-sanctuary-in-health/ [links] => ) )

Upcoming Events

  • April 02, 2019, 6-8 p.m.—In Search of the Underground Railroad: Connecting People, Places, and Things

    Tuesday, April 2
    Campus Center, Rutgers-Camden
    7 p.m. lecture, preceded by exhibits beginning at 6 p.m.
    Advance registration recommended: Click here.
     
    For more than a decade, archaeologist Dr. Cheryl LaRoche has been researching and physically exploring the landscapes of eighteenth and nineteenth century free Black communities, their churches, cemeteries and institutions, and their relationship to the Underground Railroad. Dr. LaRoche will share her most recent findings and make connections with the history of South Jersey, particularly the AME Church.  Prior to the lecture, community organizations and individuals are invited to create exhibits of their Underground Railroad documents, artifacts, and stories.  Dr. LaRoche’s book, Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance, will be available for sale and signing at the end of the program.
     
    The lecture will begin at 7 p.m., preceded by community exhibits beginning at 6 p.m.
     
    Program supported by the Office of the Chancellor.  Co-Sponsoring departments and programs: History, Africana Studies, Forensic Science, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH), and The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.
     

    First in a Series, “Sanctuaries: Past Into Present”

    Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

    This spring, join friends and neighbors for “Sanctuaries: Past Into Present,” a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape. The next program in the series is: Sanctuary Now, Sanctuary When?” Tuesday, April 23, 6-8 p.m., Arch Street Meeting, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia.


    Location: Campus Center, Rutgers-Camden

  • April 23, 2019, 6-8 p.m.—Sanctuary Now, Sanctuary When?

    Tuesday, April 23, 6-8 p.m.
    Arch Street Meeting
    320 Arch Street, Philadelphia
    Advance registration recommended: Click here.

    Learn how the idea of “sanctuary” became part of immigration justice lexicon in the United States and what we can all learn from the experiences of refugees and activists, past and present.



    About the Series, “Sanctuaries: Past Into Present”

    Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

    This spring, join friends and neighbors for “Sanctuaries: Past Into Present,” a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape.


    Location: Arch Street Meeting, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia

  • June 04, 2019, 6-8 p.m.—Sanctuary in Sickness, Sanctuary in Health

    Tuesday, June 4, 2019, 6-8 p.m.
    Philadelphia Lazaretto

    Second Street and Wanamaker Avenue, Essington, Pa.
    Advance registration recommended: Click here.

    Explore the Philadelphia Lazaretto, one of the oldest quarantine stations in the United States, discover the critical role it played in Philadelphia’s immigration history, and contemplate the past, present, and future of health care for our most vulnerable.


    About The Series
    Sanctuaries: Past into Present

    Throughout American history, people have come to the Philadelphia region seeking opportunity, while others have been fleeing persecution, and still others have been forced here in chains. When have these migrants been granted the right to feel safe, and when have they been denied safety? How do we come to grips with our country’s contradictory history of celebrating the diversity these many migrations produced, while denying rights to many?

    This spring, join friends and neighbors for “Sanctuaries: Past Into Present,” a series of free public seminars offered by The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Learn from local experts about Philadelphia’s immigration and migration history, hear from activists working in the region now, and grapple with how our complicated histories shape today’s social and political landscape.


    Location: Philadelphia Lazaretto, Second Street and Wanamaker Avenue, Essington, Pa.

Archived Events

  • April 27, 2018, 7-9 p.m.—Author Event: Warner Mifflin, Unflinching Quaker Abolitionist

    Lecture and Book Signing
    Friday, April 27, 7-9 p.m.
    Arch Street Meeting House, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia
    $10 suggested donation, RSVP and/or reserve a book here.

    Sit back and relax on 200+ year-old Quaker benches while historian Gary B. Nash talks about his new book, Warner Mifflin: Unflinching Quaker Abolitionist. This event is sponsored by Arch Street Meeting House Preservation Trust and includes a lecture by the author, Q&A, book signing, light refreshments, and access to the Trust’s new exhibit space. Tickets are $10 (suggested donation). Copies of the book will be available for purchase. These can be reserved online in advance for pick up at the event.


    Location: Arch Street Meeting House, 320 Arch Street, Philadelphia

  • February 16, 2018, 11:15 a.m.—Author Event: Running the Rails: A History of Capital and Labor in the Philadelphia Transit Industry

    Rutgers-Camden, Armitage Hall, Third Floor Faculty Lounge
    Friday, February 16, 12:30-1:45 p.m.
    CURE Seminar Series, free and open to the public.

    Philadelphia exploded in violence in 1910. The general strike that year claimed the lives of some two dozen people and made Philadelphia a prominent point in the tumultuous national conflict over workers’ rights. That strike was a notable point, but not a unique one, in the history of Philadelphia’s transit system. In “Running the Rails: A History of Capital and Labor in the Philadelphia Transit Industry,” James Wolfinger outlines the chief arguments of his recent book, Running the Rails (Cornell University Press, 2016), which details a generations-long history of conflict between the workers and management at one of the nation’s largest privately owned transit systems. In particular, he focuses on how labor relations shifted from the 1880s to the 1960s as transit workers adapted to fast-paced technological innovation to keep the city’s people and commerce on the move while management sought to limit its employees’ rights. He argues that it is remarkable to see how much Philadelphia’s transit workers achieved.

    James Wolfinger, author of essays about African American Civil Rights and African American Migration in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, holds a joint appointment in History and Education at DePaul University where he is a professor and also associate dean in the College of Education. He is the author of Running the Rails: Capital and Labor in the Philadelphia Transit Industry (Cornell University Press, 2016) and Philadelphia Divided: Race and Politics in the City of Brotherly Love (UNC Press, 2007) as well as numerous articles and reviews that have appeared in the Journal of Urban History, Labor, Pennsylvania History, Journal of American History, and American Historical Review.


    Location: Rutgers-Camden

  • November 16, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.—Partner Event: “The Same Spirit of Patriotism and Sacrifice”: Pearl Harbor and the Erosion of Citizenship

    Historical Society of Pennsylvania, November 16, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

    Delve into the historical background of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor and discuss the event’s continuing impact on American public memory with West Chester University’s Robert Kodosky, author of the “Veterans and Veterans’ Organizations” essay in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia.  The event is free for members of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania; $10 for nonmembers. For additional information, link to the event announcement by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • November 02, 2016, 5:30 p.m.—Partner Event: Immigration in Philadelphia

    Athenaeum of Philadelphia, November 2, 2016, 5:30 p.m.

    As controversial as immigration policy has been in the current national election, Philadelphia, like many older American cities, credits immigrants with boosting the city’s population in the twenty-first century after decades of decline. These newcomers are but one wave of many over generations that have left their mark on the character of the region. Yet few area residents are aware of either the diversity or the location of immigrant settlement over the years, let alone what their impact has been in changing neighborhoods like South Philadelphia or towns throughout the metropolitan area. Illustrating their contribution to community-based knowledge in a changing media environment, editors and authors of the The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will show how this form of scholarship can address even the most contentious of contemporary issues.

    Panelists include Charlene Mires, Professor of History at Rutgers-Camden and author of Independence Hall in American Memory; Domenic Vitiello, Associate Professor of City Planning and Urban Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and author of a forthcoming book on recent immigration to the Philadelphia area; Caroline Golab, Associate Dean, Academic & Student Affairs, Thomas Jefferson University; and Howard Gillette, Professor Emeritus of History at Rutgers-Camden and author of Camden after the Fall.

    This event has received generous support from the Henry Paul Busch Fund.

    Reception to follow.

    Athenaeum Members: Free.  RSVP by calling 215-925-2688 or emailing events@philaathenaeum.org
    Non-Members: $10


    Location: Athenaeum of Philadelphia, 219 S. Sixth Street

  • September 22, 2016, 5:30-7 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Jewelers Row, An Historic Perspective

    Join us at the Philadelphia History Museum on Thursday, September 22, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. for a conversation about the history and significance of Philadelphia’s Jewelers Row.  Speakers will include Paul Steinke, Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia; Hy Goldberg, Jewelers Row Business Association; Bob Skiba, Association of Philadelphia Tour Guides; and representatives from Visit Philadelphia.  The program is free, but registration is required. Click here to register.


    Location: Philadelphia History Museum, 15 S. Seventh Street

  • June 15, 2016, 6-7 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event | Counting Trees: The Search for Fairmount Park

    Philadelphia boasts one of the oldest, largest and most diverse park systems in the United States. Yet the city’s parks receive scant attention in histories of landscape design and city planning. In Counting Trees: The Search for Fairmount Park, Elizabeth Milroy, author of The Grid and the River: Philadelphia’s Green Places, 1682-1876, will describe the development of Philadelphia’s urban parks in the two centuries after William Penn and Thomas Holme drew public squares on the seminal city plan.

    This program is FREE but registration is required.

    Elizabeth Milroy has contributed several essays to The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, including a history of Philadelphia’s public parks.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • May 18, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown

    Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m.
    Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

    Philadelphia’s Chinatown, like many urban Chinatowns, began in the late nineteenth century as a refuge for immigrant laborers and merchants in which to form a community to raise families and conduct business. But this enclave for expression, identity, and community is also the embodiment of historical legacies and personal and collective memories.

    In her book Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown, Kathryn Wilson charts the unique history of this neighborhood, the community’s efforts to save and renew itself, and the continuing living community for subsequent waves of new immigration. Joining Dr. Wilson for this program at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will be  community members she interviewed for the Ethnic Renewal project, including Mary Yee, one of the leaders of the Save Chinatown movement, and John Chin, who grew up in the neighborhood and serves as executive director of Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation. After the presentation, examples from HSP collections representing Chinatown’s history will be on display for exploration and discussion.

    Admission free. For further information visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania calendar.

    Read Kathryn Wilson’s essay about Chinatown in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia: link here.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

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