Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia

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Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

Philadelphia’s Chinatown, like many urban Chinatowns, began in the late nineteenth century as a refuge for immigrant laborers and merchants in which to form a community to raise families and conduct business. But this enclave for expression, identity, and community is also the embodiment of historical legacies and personal and collective memories.

In her book Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown, Kathryn Wilson charts the unique history of this neighborhood, the community’s efforts to save and renew itself, and the continuing living community for subsequent waves of new immigration. Joining Dr. Wilson for this program at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will be  community members she interviewed for the Ethnic Renewal project, including Mary Yee, one of the leaders of the Save Chinatown movement, and John Chin, who grew up in the neighborhood and serves as executive director of Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation. After the presentation, examples from HSP collections representing Chinatown’s history will be on display for exploration and discussion.

Admission free. For further information visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania calendar.

Read Kathryn Wilson's essay about Chinatown in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia: link here.

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Come to Rutgers-Camden on Rutgers Day, April 30, to meet the people behind the scenes of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Explore your region with a digital scavenger hunt and test your knowledge with the Camden Connections game. Look for us in the Campus Center, and explore the many other activities of Rutgers Day.

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Get loud in the library this February as the Historical Society of Pennsylvania transforms from a shushed library into a raucous dance hall. Dance the night away as the sounds of Jazz Age America fill HSP's halls with tunes from the Philadelphia-based band Bitters & Rye. Prior to cutting loose on the dance floor, frisk your whiskers with a presentation by music historian Jack McCarthy as he explores Philadelphia's prominence in jazz history with stories and images of the city's groundbreaking jazz artists

For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania events calendar.

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John Fryer – disguised as Dr. Anonymous - urged doctors not to treat gays and lesbians as "sick."  But there was another man behind that mask:  a devoted choir and organ master.  Be the first to hear a newly digitized recording found in his collection as we explore what church music meant to him and how it evolves as society and culture change. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Embedded Artist Ain Gordon will also unveil a recording found in the Fryer collection.

For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

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Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will speak at this program exploring the intimate connection between Gustav Mahler’s 8th Symphony (also known as the “Symphony of a Thousand”) and the international emergence of the Orchestra.

For information about the cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

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Music has been used both as a vehicle for reform and repression during the pursuits of American ethnic and racial justice. Using historical sheet music, broadsides from local theaters, and musical recordings and performances, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania explores the various ways Philadelphia popular culture has depicted American ethnic groups throughout the past two centuries with Sights & Sounds of our Multiethnic Past. Far from "high culture," these musical and artistic characterizations were often irreverent and poked fun at the proclivities and habits of different ethnic or racial groups living in Philadelphia. However, these materials also document prevailing prejudices and bigotry, offering a sneak peek into the development of social attitudes via popular music and theater. Collection materials from the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies – many not seen for decades – will also be on view.

For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

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Philadelphia has an extraordinarily rich and important musical history. From the late eighteenth century, when it was the political and cultural capital of the American colonies, to the present, the city has nurtured numerous ground breaking musical styles and artists and been at the forefront of some of the world’s most significant musical developments. Music historian Jack McCarthy explores some of the highlights of Philadelphia music over the course of more than 330 years. Featured will be the stories of America’s first song composer, first African American to have his music published, the nation’s first “mega-concert,” great organizations such as the Philadelphia Orchestra, Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia International Records, and Cameo-Parkway Records, as well as many of the city’s groundbreaking artists in classical music, jazz, gospel, rock n’ roll, rhythm & blues/soul.

For further information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

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Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

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Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

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Created Equal? Freedom Riders: Roadblocks and Redemption on "Freedom's Main Line"
Thursday, March 26, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.
National Constitution Center,
525 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free

In 1961, U.S. Supreme Court decisions that overturned racial segregation in interstate travel were largely ignored in the South. To challenge this status quo, more than 400 black and white Americans, called Freedom Riders, performed a simple act: they traveled into the segregated South in small interracial groups and sat where they pleased on interstate buses.

The National Constitution Center invites you to a screening of Freedom Riders, exploring the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of these volunteers as they risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. The film includes previously unseen amateur 8mm footage of the burning bus on which some Freedom Riders were temporarily trapped, taken by a local twelve-year-old and held as evidence since 1961 by the FBI.

Jeffrey Rosen, NCC’s President & CEO and a constitutional law scholar, will discuss the heroic acts of the Freedom Riders and the conflicts with the Kennedy administration. Guest speakers will join in the lively conversation about the 1961 Freedom Rides, and attendees will take a tour through the new Kennedy Exhibition. 


About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

Philadelphia’s Chinatown, like many urban Chinatowns, began in the late nineteenth century as a refuge for immigrant laborers and merchants in which to form a community to raise families and conduct business. But this enclave for expression, identity, and community is also the embodiment of historical legacies and personal and collective memories.

In her book Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown, Kathryn Wilson charts the unique history of this neighborhood, the community’s efforts to save and renew itself, and the continuing living community for subsequent waves of new immigration. Joining Dr. Wilson for this program at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will be  community members she interviewed for the Ethnic Renewal project, including Mary Yee, one of the leaders of the Save Chinatown movement, and John Chin, who grew up in the neighborhood and serves as executive director of Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation. After the presentation, examples from HSP collections representing Chinatown’s history will be on display for exploration and discussion.

Admission free. For further information visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania calendar.

Read Kathryn Wilson's essay about Chinatown in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia: link here.

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Created Equal? Freedom Riders: Roadblocks and Redemption on "Freedom's Main Line"
Thursday, March 26, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.
National Constitution Center,
525 Arch Street, Philadelphia
Admission Free

In 1961, U.S. Supreme Court decisions that overturned racial segregation in interstate travel were largely ignored in the South. To challenge this status quo, more than 400 black and white Americans, called Freedom Riders, performed a simple act: they traveled into the segregated South in small interracial groups and sat where they pleased on interstate buses.

The National Constitution Center invites you to a screening of Freedom Riders, exploring the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of these volunteers as they risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. The film includes previously unseen amateur 8mm footage of the burning bus on which some Freedom Riders were temporarily trapped, taken by a local twelve-year-old and held as evidence since 1961 by the FBI.

Jeffrey Rosen, NCC’s President & CEO and a constitutional law scholar, will discuss the heroic acts of the Freedom Riders and the conflicts with the Kennedy administration. Guest speakers will join in the lively conversation about the 1961 Freedom Rides, and attendees will take a tour through the new Kennedy Exhibition. 


About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.

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Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

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Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

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Philadelphia has an extraordinarily rich and important musical history. From the late eighteenth century, when it was the political and cultural capital of the American colonies, to the present, the city has nurtured numerous ground breaking musical styles and artists and been at the forefront of some of the world’s most significant musical developments. Music historian Jack McCarthy explores some of the highlights of Philadelphia music over the course of more than 330 years. Featured will be the stories of America’s first song composer, first African American to have his music published, the nation’s first “mega-concert,” great organizations such as the Philadelphia Orchestra, Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia International Records, and Cameo-Parkway Records, as well as many of the city’s groundbreaking artists in classical music, jazz, gospel, rock n’ roll, rhythm & blues/soul.

For further information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

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Get loud in the library this February as the Historical Society of Pennsylvania transforms from a shushed library into a raucous dance hall. Dance the night away as the sounds of Jazz Age America fill HSP's halls with tunes from the Philadelphia-based band Bitters & Rye. Prior to cutting loose on the dance floor, frisk your whiskers with a presentation by music historian Jack McCarthy as he explores Philadelphia's prominence in jazz history with stories and images of the city's groundbreaking jazz artists

For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania events calendar.

[time] => 6:30-8:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-swingin-at-the-society/ [links] => ) [1456876800] => Array ( [startdate] => March 02, 2016 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Sights & Sounds of Our Ethnic Past [content] =>

Music has been used both as a vehicle for reform and repression during the pursuits of American ethnic and racial justice. Using historical sheet music, broadsides from local theaters, and musical recordings and performances, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania explores the various ways Philadelphia popular culture has depicted American ethnic groups throughout the past two centuries with Sights & Sounds of our Multiethnic Past. Far from "high culture," these musical and artistic characterizations were often irreverent and poked fun at the proclivities and habits of different ethnic or racial groups living in Philadelphia. However, these materials also document prevailing prejudices and bigotry, offering a sneak peek into the development of social attitudes via popular music and theater. Collection materials from the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies – many not seen for decades – will also be on view.

For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

[time] => 6-7 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-sights-sounds-of-our-ethnic-past/ [links] => ) [1457418600] => Array ( [startdate] => March 08, 2016 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: The Symphony of a Thousand [content] =>

Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will speak at this program exploring the intimate connection between Gustav Mahler’s 8th Symphony (also known as the “Symphony of a Thousand”) and the international emergence of the Orchestra.

For information about the cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

[time] => 6:30-8:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/the-symphony-of-a-thousand/ [links] => ) [1459405800] => Array ( [startdate] => March 31, 2016 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: “The (Musical) Spark in My Life” [content] =>

John Fryer – disguised as Dr. Anonymous - urged doctors not to treat gays and lesbians as "sick."  But there was another man behind that mask:  a devoted choir and organ master.  Be the first to hear a newly digitized recording found in his collection as we explore what church music meant to him and how it evolves as society and culture change. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Embedded Artist Ain Gordon will also unveil a recording found in the Fryer collection.

For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania's Memories & Melodies web page.

[time] => 6:30-8:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-the-musical-spark-in-my-life/ [links] => ) [1462010400] => Array ( [startdate] => April 30, 2016 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Rutgers-Camden [title] => Know Your Region: Encyclopedia of Fun! [content] =>

Come to Rutgers-Camden on Rutgers Day, April 30, to meet the people behind the scenes of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Explore your region with a digital scavenger hunt and test your knowledge with the Camden Connections game. Look for us in the Campus Center, and explore the many other activities of Rutgers Day.

[time] => 10 a.m.-4 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/know-your-region-encyclopedia-of-fun/ [links] => ) [1463529600] => Array ( [startdate] => May 18, 2016 [enddate] => [no-end-date] => 1 [location] => Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia [title] => Co-Sponsored Event: Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown [content] =>

Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m.
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

Philadelphia’s Chinatown, like many urban Chinatowns, began in the late nineteenth century as a refuge for immigrant laborers and merchants in which to form a community to raise families and conduct business. But this enclave for expression, identity, and community is also the embodiment of historical legacies and personal and collective memories.

In her book Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown, Kathryn Wilson charts the unique history of this neighborhood, the community’s efforts to save and renew itself, and the continuing living community for subsequent waves of new immigration. Joining Dr. Wilson for this program at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will be  community members she interviewed for the Ethnic Renewal project, including Mary Yee, one of the leaders of the Save Chinatown movement, and John Chin, who grew up in the neighborhood and serves as executive director of Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation. After the presentation, examples from HSP collections representing Chinatown’s history will be on display for exploration and discussion.

Admission free. For further information visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania calendar.

Read Kathryn Wilson's essay about Chinatown in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia: link here.

[time] => 6-7:30 p.m. [url] => https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/events/co-sponsored-event-ethnic-renewal-in-philadelphias-chinatown/ [links] => ) )

Archived Events

  • May 18, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown

    Wednesday, May 18, 2016, 6-7:30 p.m.
    Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

    Philadelphia’s Chinatown, like many urban Chinatowns, began in the late nineteenth century as a refuge for immigrant laborers and merchants in which to form a community to raise families and conduct business. But this enclave for expression, identity, and community is also the embodiment of historical legacies and personal and collective memories.

    In her book Ethnic Renewal in Philadelphia’s Chinatown, Kathryn Wilson charts the unique history of this neighborhood, the community’s efforts to save and renew itself, and the continuing living community for subsequent waves of new immigration. Joining Dr. Wilson for this program at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania will be  community members she interviewed for the Ethnic Renewal project, including Mary Yee, one of the leaders of the Save Chinatown movement, and John Chin, who grew up in the neighborhood and serves as executive director of Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation. After the presentation, examples from HSP collections representing Chinatown’s history will be on display for exploration and discussion.

    Admission free. For further information visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania calendar.

    Read Kathryn Wilson’s essay about Chinatown in The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia: link here.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • April 30, 2016, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.—Know Your Region: Encyclopedia of Fun!

    Come to Rutgers-Camden on Rutgers Day, April 30, to meet the people behind the scenes of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Explore your region with a digital scavenger hunt and test your knowledge with the Camden Connections game. Look for us in the Campus Center, and explore the many other activities of Rutgers Day.


    Location: Rutgers-Camden

  • March 31, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: “The (Musical) Spark in My Life”

    John Fryer – disguised as Dr. Anonymous – urged doctors not to treat gays and lesbians as “sick.”  But there was another man behind that mask:  a devoted choir and organ master.  Be the first to hear a newly digitized recording found in his collection as we explore what church music meant to him and how it evolves as society and culture change. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s Embedded Artist Ain Gordon will also unveil a recording found in the Fryer collection.

    For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s Memories & Melodies web page.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • March 08, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: The Symphony of a Thousand

    Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin will speak at this program exploring the intimate connection between Gustav Mahler’s 8th Symphony (also known as the “Symphony of a Thousand”) and the international emergence of the Orchestra.

    For information about the cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s Memories & Melodies web page.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • March 02, 2016, 6-7 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Sights & Sounds of Our Ethnic Past

    Music has been used both as a vehicle for reform and repression during the pursuits of American ethnic and racial justice. Using historical sheet music, broadsides from local theaters, and musical recordings and performances, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania explores the various ways Philadelphia popular culture has depicted American ethnic groups throughout the past two centuries with Sights & Sounds of our Multiethnic Past. Far from “high culture,” these musical and artistic characterizations were often irreverent and poked fun at the proclivities and habits of different ethnic or racial groups living in Philadelphia. However, these materials also document prevailing prejudices and bigotry, offering a sneak peek into the development of social attitudes via popular music and theater. Collection materials from the Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies – many not seen for decades – will also be on view.

    For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s Memories & Melodies web page.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • February 25, 2016, 6:30-8:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Swingin’ at the Society

    Get loud in the library this February as the Historical Society of Pennsylvania transforms from a shushed library into a raucous dance hall. Dance the night away as the sounds of Jazz Age America fill HSP’s halls with tunes from the Philadelphia-based band Bitters & Rye. Prior to cutting loose on the dance floor, frisk your whiskers with a presentation by music historian Jack McCarthy as he explores Philadelphia’s prominence in jazz history with stories and images of the city’s groundbreaking jazz artists

    For information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania events calendar.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • February 17, 2016, 6-7 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Philadelphia, City of Music

    Philadelphia has an extraordinarily rich and important musical history. From the late eighteenth century, when it was the political and cultural capital of the American colonies, to the present, the city has nurtured numerous ground breaking musical styles and artists and been at the forefront of some of the world’s most significant musical developments. Music historian Jack McCarthy explores some of the highlights of Philadelphia music over the course of more than 330 years. Featured will be the stories of America’s first song composer, first African American to have his music published, the nation’s first “mega-concert,” great organizations such as the Philadelphia Orchestra, Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia International Records, and Cameo-Parkway Records, as well as many of the city’s groundbreaking artists in classical music, jazz, gospel, rock n’ roll, rhythm & blues/soul.

    For further information about cost of admission and registration, visit the Historical Society of Pennsylvania’s Memories & Melodies web page.


    Location: Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1300 Locust Street, Philadelphia

  • July 26, 2015-July 31, 2015—NEH Teacher Institute: Cultures of Independence

    Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

    The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
    For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.


    Location: Philadelphia

  • June 21, 2015-June 26, 2015—NEH Teacher Institute: Cultures of Independence

    Applications are now being accepted for this new teacher workshop funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Cultures of Independence: Perspectives on Independence Hall and the Meaning of Freedom will raise awareness of how Independence Hall has been involved in the ongoing process of creating a nation and civic life, not just in the magical moment of July 1776.  During each day of  a week-long workshop, 36 teachers will be immersed in a process of discovering and developing strategies for teaching the ongoing history of the American independence. Dr. Charlene Mires, author of Independence Hall in American Memory and Editor-in-Chief of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia will be the scholar-in-residence.

    The workshop will be offered twice:  June 21-26 and July 26-July 31. Applications are now being accepted through March 2, 2015. 
    For additional information about the program and procedures for application, visit the workshop website hosted by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.


    Location: Philadelphia

  • March 26, 2015, 6-7:30 p.m.—Co-Sponsored Event: Created Equal? Freedom Riders

    Created Equal? Freedom Riders: Roadblocks and Redemption on “Freedom’s Main Line”
    Thursday, March 26, 2015, 67:30 p.m.
    National Constitution Center,
    525 Arch Street, Philadelphia
    Admission Free

    In 1961, U.S. Supreme Court decisions that overturned racial segregation in interstate travel were largely ignored in the South. To challenge this status quo, more than 400 black and white Americans, called Freedom Riders, performed a simple act: they traveled into the segregated South in small interracial groups and sat where they pleased on interstate buses.

    The National Constitution Center invites you to a screening of Freedom Riders, exploring the terrifying, moving, and suspenseful story of these volunteers as they risked being jailed, beaten, or killed, as white local and state authorities ignored or encouraged violent attacks. The film includes previously unseen amateur 8mm footage of the burning bus on which some Freedom Riders were temporarily trapped, taken by a local twelve-year-old and held as evidence since 1961 by the FBI.

    Jeffrey Rosen, NCC’s President & CEO and a constitutional law scholar, will discuss the heroic acts of the Freedom Riders and the conflicts with the Kennedy administration. Guest speakers will join in the lively conversation about the 1961 Freedom Rides, and attendees will take a tour through the new Kennedy Exhibition. 


    About Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle

    To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the passage of 13th Amendment,, HSP has partnered with the African American Museum in Philadelphia, the National Constitution Center, the Philadelphia History Museum, and the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia to host screenings of four documentaries featuring riveting new footage illustrating the history of civil rights in America.

    The documentaries are part of Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle, a powerful film set produced with NEH support. Each film tells remarkable stories of individuals who challenged the social and legal status quo of deeply rooted institutions, from slavery to segregation.  These programs offer a series of lectures, discussion forums, and scholarly presentations in addition to the screenings.

    The documentaries, The AbolitionistsSlavery by Another NameThe Loving Story, and Freedom Riders, include dramatic scenes of incidents in the 150-year effort to achieve equal rights for all. Freedom Riders received an Emmy in 2012, and The Loving Story and The Abolitionists have been nominated for Emmys in 2013. 


    Created Equal: America’s Civil Rights Struggle is made possible through a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of its Bridging Cultures initiative, in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History.


    Location: National Constitution Center, 525 Arch Street, Philadelphia

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